Training requirements and curriculum content for primary care providers delivering preventive oral health services to children enrolled in medicaid

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Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Despite the emphasis on delivery of preventive oral health services in non-dental settings, limited information exists about state Medicaid policies and strategies to educate practicing physicians in the delivery of these services. This study aims to determine: (1) training requirements and policies for reimbursement of oral health services, (2) teaching delivery methods used to train physicians, and (3) curricula content available to providers among states that reimburse non-dental providers for oral health services. METHODS: Using Web-based Internet searches as the primary data source, and a supplemental e-mail survey of all states offering in-person training, we assessed training requirements, methods of delivery for training, and curriculum content for states with Medicaid reimbursement to primary care providers delivering preventive oral health services. Results of descriptive analyses are presented for information collected and updated in 2014. RESULTS: Forty-two states provide training sessions or resources to providers, 34 requiring provider training before reimbursement for oral health services. Web-based training is the most common CME delivery method. Only small differences in curricular content were reported by the 11 states that use inperson didactic sessions as the delivery method. CONCLUSIONS: Although we found that most states require training and curricular content is similar, training was most often delivered using Web-based courses without any additional delivery methods. Research is needed to evaluate the impact of a mixture of training methods and other quality improvement methods on increased adoption and implementation of preventive oral health services in medical practices.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages556-560
Number of pages5
JournalFamily Medicine
Volume48
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

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Preventive Health Services
Medicaid
Oral Health
Curriculum
Primary Health Care
Health Services
Physicians
Information Storage and Retrieval
Postal Service
Quality Improvement
Internet
Teaching
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

Cite this

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title = "Training requirements and curriculum content for primary care providers delivering preventive oral health services to children enrolled in medicaid",
abstract = "BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Despite the emphasis on delivery of preventive oral health services in non-dental settings, limited information exists about state Medicaid policies and strategies to educate practicing physicians in the delivery of these services. This study aims to determine: (1) training requirements and policies for reimbursement of oral health services, (2) teaching delivery methods used to train physicians, and (3) curricula content available to providers among states that reimburse non-dental providers for oral health services. METHODS: Using Web-based Internet searches as the primary data source, and a supplemental e-mail survey of all states offering in-person training, we assessed training requirements, methods of delivery for training, and curriculum content for states with Medicaid reimbursement to primary care providers delivering preventive oral health services. Results of descriptive analyses are presented for information collected and updated in 2014. RESULTS: Forty-two states provide training sessions or resources to providers, 34 requiring provider training before reimbursement for oral health services. Web-based training is the most common CME delivery method. Only small differences in curricular content were reported by the 11 states that use inperson didactic sessions as the delivery method. CONCLUSIONS: Although we found that most states require training and curricular content is similar, training was most often delivered using Web-based courses without any additional delivery methods. Research is needed to evaluate the impact of a mixture of training methods and other quality improvement methods on increased adoption and implementation of preventive oral health services in medical practices.",
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