That's what I like: The use of circumscribed interests within interventions for individuals with autism spectrum disorder. A systematic review

Clare Harrop, Jessica Amsbary, Sarah Towner-Wright, Brian Reichow, Brian A Boyd

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Background: Circumscribed interests (CI) are a subcategory of restricted and repetitive behaviors that occur commonly in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). CI are characterized by an intense and focused interest in a narrow range of subjects. The purpose of this systematic review is to determine how interests are incorporated within interventions for individuals with ASD across the lifespan; what symptoms, domains and outcomes these interventions target; and the effectiveness of such interventions. Method: The methods used within this review were consistent with those recommended by the Cochrane and Campbell Collaborations. Inclusion criteria were based on three predetermined categories: (1) Study Population; (2) Intervention Design; and (3) Outcome Variables. Data were extracted and coded based on these three predetermined categories. Results: 246 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility, of which 31 studies were eligible for data extraction. The majority of studies were single subject designs (k = 28) and focused on toddlers/preschool (k = 13) or school-aged children (k = 17). Common interests utilized were TV shows or movies (N = 21), popular characters (N = 18), computers/video games (N = 12) and transportation (N = 11). Conclusions: Results suggest that the inclusion of CI within interventions can lead to positive effects across a number of domains. More research is required to examine the effects of individualized interests within group design studies. Methods for this review were registered with PROSPERO (42016036981).

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages63-86
Number of pages24
JournalResearch in Autism Spectrum Disorders
Volume57
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Keywords

  • Autism
  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Circumscribed interests
  • Intervention
  • Repetitive behaviors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

That's what I like : The use of circumscribed interests within interventions for individuals with autism spectrum disorder. A systematic review. / Harrop, Clare; Amsbary, Jessica; Towner-Wright, Sarah; Reichow, Brian; Boyd, Brian A.

In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, Vol. 57, 01.01.2019, p. 63-86.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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