Social Information-Processing Skills and Aggression: A Quasi-Experimental Trial of the Making Choices and Making Choices Plus Programs

Mary A. Terzian, Jilan Li, Mark W. Fraser, Steven H. Day, Roderick A. Rose

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

  • 3 Citations

Abstract

This article describes the findings from an efficacy trial of a school-based, universal prevention program designed to reduce aggressive behavior of by strengthening emotion regulation and social information-processing (SIP) skills. Three cohorts of third graders (N = 479) participated in this study. The first cohort participated in the Making Choices (MC) program, a second cohort participated in the Making Choices Plus (MC+) program, and a third (lagged) cohort received the standard health education curriculum. Pretest to posttest changes suggest both programs were associated with reduced levels of aggression and improved SIP skills. Gender-moderating effects were observed—boys displayed significant reductions in aggressive behavior and significant increases in positive social goals, whereas girls’ aggressive behaviors and social goals showed no significant changes.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages358-369
Number of pages12
JournalResearch on Social Work Practice
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

information processing
aggression
Aggression
Automatic Data Processing
aggressive behavior
Health Education
Curriculum
Emotions
education curriculum
health promotion
emotion
gender
school

Keywords

  • aggression
  • emotion regulation
  • prevention
  • social information processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

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