Self-reported myocardial infarction and fatal coronary heart disease among oil spill workers and community members 5 years after Deepwater Horizon

Jean Strelitz, Alexander P. Keil, David B Richardson, Gerardo Heiss, Marilie D Gammon, Richard K. Kwok, Dale P. Sandler, Lawrence Engel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Chemical, physical and psychological stressors due to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill may impact coronary heart disease (CHD) among exposed populations. Using longitudinal information from two interviews in the Gulf Long Term Follow-up (GuLF) STUDY, we assessed CHD among oil spill workers and community members. Objective: To assess the associations between duration of oil spill clean-up work, residential proximity to the oil spill, and incidence of self-reported myocardial infarction or fatal CHD. Methods: Among respondents with two GuLF STUDY interviews (n = 21,256), there were 395 first incident heart disease events (self-reported myocardial infarction or fatal CHD) across 5 years. We estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for associations with duration of oil spill clean-up work and residential proximity to the oil spill. To assess potential impacts of non-response, we compared covariate distributions for those who did (n = 21,256) and did not (n = 10,353) complete the second interview and used inverse probability (IP) of censoring weights to correct for potential non-response bias. Results: Living in proximity to the oil spill (vs. living further away) was associated with heart disease, with [HR(95%CI) = 1.30(1.01–1.67)] and without [1.29(1.00–1.65)] censoring weights. For work duration, hazard of heart disease appeared to be higher for those who worked > 180 days (vs. 1–30 days), with and without censoring weights [1.43(0.91–2.25) and 1.36(0.88–2.11), respectively]. Associations persisted throughout the 5-year follow-up. Conclusions: Residential proximity to the spill and duration of clean-up work were associated with a suggested 29–43% higher hazard of heart disease events. Associations were robust to censoring.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages70-79
Number of pages10
JournalEnvironmental Research
Volume168
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Petroleum Pollution
cardiovascular disease
Oil spills
oil spill
Coronary Disease
Myocardial Infarction
Heart Diseases
Hazards
hazard
Interviews
Weights and Measures
confidence interval
Confidence Intervals
Hazardous materials spills
Psychology
Incidence

Keywords

  • Coronary disease
  • Deepwater Horizon
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Occupational exposure
  • Petroleum pollution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Self-reported myocardial infarction and fatal coronary heart disease among oil spill workers and community members 5 years after Deepwater Horizon. / Strelitz, Jean; Keil, Alexander P.; Richardson, David B; Heiss, Gerardo; Gammon, Marilie D; Kwok, Richard K.; Sandler, Dale P.; Engel, Lawrence.

In: Environmental Research, Vol. 168, 01.01.2019, p. 70-79.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6cdf50ccd3104285afb6aa4565deb6f5,
title = "Self-reported myocardial infarction and fatal coronary heart disease among oil spill workers and community members 5 years after Deepwater Horizon",
abstract = "Background: Chemical, physical and psychological stressors due to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill may impact coronary heart disease (CHD) among exposed populations. Using longitudinal information from two interviews in the Gulf Long Term Follow-up (GuLF) STUDY, we assessed CHD among oil spill workers and community members. Objective: To assess the associations between duration of oil spill clean-up work, residential proximity to the oil spill, and incidence of self-reported myocardial infarction or fatal CHD. Methods: Among respondents with two GuLF STUDY interviews (n = 21,256), there were 395 first incident heart disease events (self-reported myocardial infarction or fatal CHD) across 5 years. We estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (95{\%}CI) for associations with duration of oil spill clean-up work and residential proximity to the oil spill. To assess potential impacts of non-response, we compared covariate distributions for those who did (n = 21,256) and did not (n = 10,353) complete the second interview and used inverse probability (IP) of censoring weights to correct for potential non-response bias. Results: Living in proximity to the oil spill (vs. living further away) was associated with heart disease, with [HR(95{\%}CI) = 1.30(1.01–1.67)] and without [1.29(1.00–1.65)] censoring weights. For work duration, hazard of heart disease appeared to be higher for those who worked > 180 days (vs. 1–30 days), with and without censoring weights [1.43(0.91–2.25) and 1.36(0.88–2.11), respectively]. Associations persisted throughout the 5-year follow-up. Conclusions: Residential proximity to the spill and duration of clean-up work were associated with a suggested 29–43{\%} higher hazard of heart disease events. Associations were robust to censoring.",
keywords = "Coronary disease, Deepwater Horizon, Myocardial infarction, Occupational exposure, Petroleum pollution",
author = "Jean Strelitz and Keil, {Alexander P.} and Richardson, {David B} and Gerardo Heiss and Gammon, {Marilie D} and Kwok, {Richard K.} and Sandler, {Dale P.} and Lawrence Engel",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.envres.2018.09.026",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "168",
pages = "70--79",
journal = "Environmental Research",
issn = "0013-9351",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Self-reported myocardial infarction and fatal coronary heart disease among oil spill workers and community members 5 years after Deepwater Horizon

AU - Strelitz, Jean

AU - Keil, Alexander P.

AU - Richardson, David B

AU - Heiss, Gerardo

AU - Gammon, Marilie D

AU - Kwok, Richard K.

AU - Sandler, Dale P.

AU - Engel, Lawrence

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: Chemical, physical and psychological stressors due to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill may impact coronary heart disease (CHD) among exposed populations. Using longitudinal information from two interviews in the Gulf Long Term Follow-up (GuLF) STUDY, we assessed CHD among oil spill workers and community members. Objective: To assess the associations between duration of oil spill clean-up work, residential proximity to the oil spill, and incidence of self-reported myocardial infarction or fatal CHD. Methods: Among respondents with two GuLF STUDY interviews (n = 21,256), there were 395 first incident heart disease events (self-reported myocardial infarction or fatal CHD) across 5 years. We estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for associations with duration of oil spill clean-up work and residential proximity to the oil spill. To assess potential impacts of non-response, we compared covariate distributions for those who did (n = 21,256) and did not (n = 10,353) complete the second interview and used inverse probability (IP) of censoring weights to correct for potential non-response bias. Results: Living in proximity to the oil spill (vs. living further away) was associated with heart disease, with [HR(95%CI) = 1.30(1.01–1.67)] and without [1.29(1.00–1.65)] censoring weights. For work duration, hazard of heart disease appeared to be higher for those who worked > 180 days (vs. 1–30 days), with and without censoring weights [1.43(0.91–2.25) and 1.36(0.88–2.11), respectively]. Associations persisted throughout the 5-year follow-up. Conclusions: Residential proximity to the spill and duration of clean-up work were associated with a suggested 29–43% higher hazard of heart disease events. Associations were robust to censoring.

AB - Background: Chemical, physical and psychological stressors due to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill may impact coronary heart disease (CHD) among exposed populations. Using longitudinal information from two interviews in the Gulf Long Term Follow-up (GuLF) STUDY, we assessed CHD among oil spill workers and community members. Objective: To assess the associations between duration of oil spill clean-up work, residential proximity to the oil spill, and incidence of self-reported myocardial infarction or fatal CHD. Methods: Among respondents with two GuLF STUDY interviews (n = 21,256), there were 395 first incident heart disease events (self-reported myocardial infarction or fatal CHD) across 5 years. We estimated hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for associations with duration of oil spill clean-up work and residential proximity to the oil spill. To assess potential impacts of non-response, we compared covariate distributions for those who did (n = 21,256) and did not (n = 10,353) complete the second interview and used inverse probability (IP) of censoring weights to correct for potential non-response bias. Results: Living in proximity to the oil spill (vs. living further away) was associated with heart disease, with [HR(95%CI) = 1.30(1.01–1.67)] and without [1.29(1.00–1.65)] censoring weights. For work duration, hazard of heart disease appeared to be higher for those who worked > 180 days (vs. 1–30 days), with and without censoring weights [1.43(0.91–2.25) and 1.36(0.88–2.11), respectively]. Associations persisted throughout the 5-year follow-up. Conclusions: Residential proximity to the spill and duration of clean-up work were associated with a suggested 29–43% higher hazard of heart disease events. Associations were robust to censoring.

KW - Coronary disease

KW - Deepwater Horizon

KW - Myocardial infarction

KW - Occupational exposure

KW - Petroleum pollution

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85054075554&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85054075554&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.envres.2018.09.026

DO - 10.1016/j.envres.2018.09.026

M3 - Article

VL - 168

SP - 70

EP - 79

JO - Environmental Research

T2 - Environmental Research

JF - Environmental Research

SN - 0013-9351

ER -