Saliendo adelante: Stressors and coping strategies among immigrant Latino men who have sex with men in a nontraditional settlement state

Paul A. Gilbert, Clare L Barrington, Scott D. Rhodes, Eugenia Eng

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 2 Citations

Abstract

Immigrant Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) are marginalized along multiple dimensions (e.g., ethnicity, sexual orientation, language use), which can negatively affect their health and well-being. As little is known about how this subgroup experiences the stress of marginalization and how, in turn, they cope with such stress, this study investigated stressors and coping strategies to better understand the factors shaping Latino MSM health. Assisted by a community advisory committee, we conducted in-depth interviews with 15 foreign-born Latino MSM in a nontraditional settlement state. Drawing on grounded theory methods, we analyzed transcripts iteratively to identify processes and characterize themes. Results were confirmed in member check interviews (n = 4) and findings were further contextualized through key informant interviews (n = 3). Participants reported ubiquitous, concurrent stressors due to being an immigrant, being a sexual minority, and being working poor. In particular, homophobia within families and local Latino communities was seen as pervasive. Some participants faced additional stressors due to being undocumented and not being Mexican. Participants drew on four types of coping strategies, with no dominant coping response: passive coping (i.e., not reacting to stressors); attempting to change stressors; seeking social support; and seeking distractions. Family ties, especially with mothers, provided key emotional support but could also generate stress related to participants’ sexuality. This study lays a foundation for future work and is particularly relevant for Latino MSM in nontraditional settlement states. Findings may inform future interventions to reduce stressors and increase resiliency, which can positively affect multiple health outcomes.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages515-525
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Men's Health
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
coping
immigrant
Interviews
interview
health
Health
Homophobia
sexual orientation
grounded theory
community
social support
Sexuality
Advisory Committees
sexuality
ethnicity
Sexual Behavior
Social Support
well-being
minority

Keywords

  • Cultural disparity
  • Gay
  • Marginalization
  • Qualitative research
  • Social determinants of health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{49228624ae894e2fbde4dbc455a95151,
title = "Saliendo adelante: Stressors and coping strategies among immigrant Latino men who have sex with men in a nontraditional settlement state",
abstract = "Immigrant Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) are marginalized along multiple dimensions (e.g., ethnicity, sexual orientation, language use), which can negatively affect their health and well-being. As little is known about how this subgroup experiences the stress of marginalization and how, in turn, they cope with such stress, this study investigated stressors and coping strategies to better understand the factors shaping Latino MSM health. Assisted by a community advisory committee, we conducted in-depth interviews with 15 foreign-born Latino MSM in a nontraditional settlement state. Drawing on grounded theory methods, we analyzed transcripts iteratively to identify processes and characterize themes. Results were confirmed in member check interviews (n = 4) and findings were further contextualized through key informant interviews (n = 3). Participants reported ubiquitous, concurrent stressors due to being an immigrant, being a sexual minority, and being working poor. In particular, homophobia within families and local Latino communities was seen as pervasive. Some participants faced additional stressors due to being undocumented and not being Mexican. Participants drew on four types of coping strategies, with no dominant coping response: passive coping (i.e., not reacting to stressors); attempting to change stressors; seeking social support; and seeking distractions. Family ties, especially with mothers, provided key emotional support but could also generate stress related to participants’ sexuality. This study lays a foundation for future work and is particularly relevant for Latino MSM in nontraditional settlement states. Findings may inform future interventions to reduce stressors and increase resiliency, which can positively affect multiple health outcomes.",
keywords = "Cultural disparity, Gay, Marginalization, Qualitative research, Social determinants of health",
author = "Gilbert, {Paul A.} and Barrington, {Clare L} and Rhodes, {Scott D.} and Eugenia Eng",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1557988316647704",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
pages = "515--525",
journal = "American Journal of Men's Health",
issn = "1557-9883",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Saliendo adelante

T2 - American Journal of Men's Health

AU - Gilbert, Paul A.

AU - Barrington, Clare L

AU - Rhodes, Scott D.

AU - Eng, Eugenia

PY - 2016/1/1

Y1 - 2016/1/1

N2 - Immigrant Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) are marginalized along multiple dimensions (e.g., ethnicity, sexual orientation, language use), which can negatively affect their health and well-being. As little is known about how this subgroup experiences the stress of marginalization and how, in turn, they cope with such stress, this study investigated stressors and coping strategies to better understand the factors shaping Latino MSM health. Assisted by a community advisory committee, we conducted in-depth interviews with 15 foreign-born Latino MSM in a nontraditional settlement state. Drawing on grounded theory methods, we analyzed transcripts iteratively to identify processes and characterize themes. Results were confirmed in member check interviews (n = 4) and findings were further contextualized through key informant interviews (n = 3). Participants reported ubiquitous, concurrent stressors due to being an immigrant, being a sexual minority, and being working poor. In particular, homophobia within families and local Latino communities was seen as pervasive. Some participants faced additional stressors due to being undocumented and not being Mexican. Participants drew on four types of coping strategies, with no dominant coping response: passive coping (i.e., not reacting to stressors); attempting to change stressors; seeking social support; and seeking distractions. Family ties, especially with mothers, provided key emotional support but could also generate stress related to participants’ sexuality. This study lays a foundation for future work and is particularly relevant for Latino MSM in nontraditional settlement states. Findings may inform future interventions to reduce stressors and increase resiliency, which can positively affect multiple health outcomes.

AB - Immigrant Latino men who have sex with men (MSM) are marginalized along multiple dimensions (e.g., ethnicity, sexual orientation, language use), which can negatively affect their health and well-being. As little is known about how this subgroup experiences the stress of marginalization and how, in turn, they cope with such stress, this study investigated stressors and coping strategies to better understand the factors shaping Latino MSM health. Assisted by a community advisory committee, we conducted in-depth interviews with 15 foreign-born Latino MSM in a nontraditional settlement state. Drawing on grounded theory methods, we analyzed transcripts iteratively to identify processes and characterize themes. Results were confirmed in member check interviews (n = 4) and findings were further contextualized through key informant interviews (n = 3). Participants reported ubiquitous, concurrent stressors due to being an immigrant, being a sexual minority, and being working poor. In particular, homophobia within families and local Latino communities was seen as pervasive. Some participants faced additional stressors due to being undocumented and not being Mexican. Participants drew on four types of coping strategies, with no dominant coping response: passive coping (i.e., not reacting to stressors); attempting to change stressors; seeking social support; and seeking distractions. Family ties, especially with mothers, provided key emotional support but could also generate stress related to participants’ sexuality. This study lays a foundation for future work and is particularly relevant for Latino MSM in nontraditional settlement states. Findings may inform future interventions to reduce stressors and increase resiliency, which can positively affect multiple health outcomes.

KW - Cultural disparity

KW - Gay

KW - Marginalization

KW - Qualitative research

KW - Social determinants of health

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84994908834&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84994908834&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1557988316647704

DO - 10.1177/1557988316647704

M3 - Article

VL - 10

SP - 515

EP - 525

JO - American Journal of Men's Health

JF - American Journal of Men's Health

SN - 1557-9883

IS - 6

ER -