Prejudice and perception: The role of automatic and controlled processes in misperceiving a weapon

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Abstract

Two experiments used a priming paradigm to investigate the influence of racial cues on the perceptual identification of weapons. In Experiment 1, participants identified guns faster when primed with Black faces compared with White faces. In Experiment 2, participants were required to respond quickly, causing the racial bias to shift from reaction time to accuracy. Participants misidentified tools as guns more often when primed with a Black face than with a White face. L. L. Jacoby's (1991) process dissociation procedure was applied to demonstrate that racial primes influenced automatic (A) processing, but not controlled (C) processing. The response deadline reduced the C estimate but not the A estimate. The motivation to control prejudice moderated the relationship between explicit prejudice and automatic bias. Implications are discussed on applied and theoretical levels.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages181-192
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume81
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2001
Externally publishedYes

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weapon
prejudice
experiment
Weapons
trend
Firearms
paradigm
time
Racism
Reaction Time
Cues
Motivation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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