Persistent adaptation by chronic alcohol is facilitated by neuroimmune activation linked to stress and CRF

George R. Breese, Darin J. Knapp

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

  • 1 Citations

Abstract

This review updates the conceptual basis for the association of alcohol abuse with an insidious adaptation that facilitates negative affect during withdrawal from chronic intermittent alcohol (CIA) exposure - a change that later supports sensitization of stress-induced anxiety following alcohol abstinence. The finding that a CRF1-receptor antagonist (CRF1RA) minimized CIA withdrawal-induced negative affect supported an association of alcohol withdrawal with a stress mechanism. The finding that repeated stresses or multiple CRF injections into selected brain sites prior to a single 5-day chronic alcohol (CA) exposure induced anxiety during withdrawal provided critical support for a linkage of CIA withdrawal with stress. The determination that CRF1RA injection into positive CRF-sensitive brain sites prevented CIA withdrawal-induced anxiety provided support that neural path integration maintains the persistent CIA adaptation. Based upon reports that stress increases neuroimmune function, an effort was undertaken to test whether cytokines would support the adaptation induced by stress/CA exposure. Twenty-four hours after withdrawal from CIA, cytokine mRNAs were found to be increased in cortex as well as other sites in brain. Further, repeated cytokine injections into previously identified brain sites substituted for stress and CRF induction of anxiety during CA withdrawal. Discovery that a CRF1RA prevented the brain cytokine mRNA increase induced by CA withdrawal provided critical evidence for CRF involvement in this neuroimmune induction after CA withdrawal. However, the CRF1RA did not block the stress increase in cytokine mRNA increases in controls. The latter data supported the hypothesis that distinct mechanisms linked to stress and CA withdrawal can support common neuroimmune functions within a brain site. As evidence evolves concerning neural involvement in brain neuroimmune function, a better understanding of the progressive adaptation associated with CIA exposure will advance new knowledge that could possibly lead to strategies to combat alcohol abuse.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages9-23
Number of pages15
JournalAlcohol
Volume52
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

Fingerprint

activation
alcohol
Chemical activation
Alcohols
withdrawal
Brain
brain
Cytokines
Anxiety
CRF receptor type 1
anxiety
Messenger RNA
Injections
Alcoholism
induction
abuse
evidence
Association reactions
Alcohol Abstinence
sensitization

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Anxiety
  • Chronic alcohol withdrawal
  • CRF
  • Neuroimmune
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Biochemistry
  • Toxicology
  • Neurology
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Persistent adaptation by chronic alcohol is facilitated by neuroimmune activation linked to stress and CRF. / Breese, George R.; Knapp, Darin J.

In: Alcohol, Vol. 52, 01.05.2016, p. 9-23.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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abstract = "This review updates the conceptual basis for the association of alcohol abuse with an insidious adaptation that facilitates negative affect during withdrawal from chronic intermittent alcohol (CIA) exposure - a change that later supports sensitization of stress-induced anxiety following alcohol abstinence. The finding that a CRF1-receptor antagonist (CRF1RA) minimized CIA withdrawal-induced negative affect supported an association of alcohol withdrawal with a stress mechanism. The finding that repeated stresses or multiple CRF injections into selected brain sites prior to a single 5-day chronic alcohol (CA) exposure induced anxiety during withdrawal provided critical support for a linkage of CIA withdrawal with stress. The determination that CRF1RA injection into positive CRF-sensitive brain sites prevented CIA withdrawal-induced anxiety provided support that neural path integration maintains the persistent CIA adaptation. Based upon reports that stress increases neuroimmune function, an effort was undertaken to test whether cytokines would support the adaptation induced by stress/CA exposure. Twenty-four hours after withdrawal from CIA, cytokine mRNAs were found to be increased in cortex as well as other sites in brain. Further, repeated cytokine injections into previously identified brain sites substituted for stress and CRF induction of anxiety during CA withdrawal. Discovery that a CRF1RA prevented the brain cytokine mRNA increase induced by CA withdrawal provided critical evidence for CRF involvement in this neuroimmune induction after CA withdrawal. However, the CRF1RA did not block the stress increase in cytokine mRNA increases in controls. The latter data supported the hypothesis that distinct mechanisms linked to stress and CA withdrawal can support common neuroimmune functions within a brain site. As evidence evolves concerning neural involvement in brain neuroimmune function, a better understanding of the progressive adaptation associated with CIA exposure will advance new knowledge that could possibly lead to strategies to combat alcohol abuse.",
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