Patient adoption of an internet based diabetes medication tool to improve adherence: A pilot study

Scott A. Davis, Delesha Carpenter, Doyle M. Cummings, Charles Lee, Susan J. Blalock, Jennifer Elissa Scott, Lisa Rodebaugh, Stefanie P. Ferreri, Betsy Sleath

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective To investigate the effect of a video intervention, Managing Your Diabetes Medicines, on patient self-efficacy, problems with using medication, and medication adherence in a rural, mostly African American population. Methods Patients selected their problem areas in medication use and watched one of nine 2-min videos with a research assistant at a clinic or pharmacy and were given an access code to watch all the videos at their convenience. Outcomes were measured at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Results Fifty-one patients were enrolled; 84% were African American and 80% were female (mean age: 54 years). Seventy-three percent watched at least one module after the initial visit. Improved self-efficacy was associated with a decrease in concerns about medications (r = −0.64). Low literate patients experienced greater improvement in self-efficacy than more literate patients (t = 2.54, p = 0.02). Patients’ mean number of problems declined from 6.14 to 5.03. The number of patients with high or medium adherence rose from 33% at baseline to 43% at 3-month follow-up. Conclusions A practical, customized video intervention may help improve patient self-efficacy, reduce problems with medication use, and improve medication adherence in diabetes patients. Practice implications Providers should consider implementing technology-based interventions in the clinic to address common problems that patients have with self-management.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages174-178
Number of pages5
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume100
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Internet
Self Efficacy
Medication Adherence
African Americans
Self Care
Technology
Research

Keywords

  • African American
  • Educational video
  • Health literacy
  • Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model
  • Medication problems
  • Self-efficacy
  • Self-management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Patient adoption of an internet based diabetes medication tool to improve adherence : A pilot study. / Davis, Scott A.; Carpenter, Delesha; Cummings, Doyle M.; Lee, Charles; Blalock, Susan J.; Scott, Jennifer Elissa; Rodebaugh, Lisa; Ferreri, Stefanie P.; Sleath, Betsy.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 100, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 174-178.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davis, Scott A. ; Carpenter, Delesha ; Cummings, Doyle M. ; Lee, Charles ; Blalock, Susan J. ; Scott, Jennifer Elissa ; Rodebaugh, Lisa ; Ferreri, Stefanie P. ; Sleath, Betsy. / Patient adoption of an internet based diabetes medication tool to improve adherence : A pilot study. In: Patient Education and Counseling. 2017 ; Vol. 100, No. 1. pp. 174-178
@article{f5da2746677441728561af2783355486,
title = "Patient adoption of an internet based diabetes medication tool to improve adherence: A pilot study",
abstract = "Objective To investigate the effect of a video intervention, Managing Your Diabetes Medicines, on patient self-efficacy, problems with using medication, and medication adherence in a rural, mostly African American population. Methods Patients selected their problem areas in medication use and watched one of nine 2-min videos with a research assistant at a clinic or pharmacy and were given an access code to watch all the videos at their convenience. Outcomes were measured at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Results Fifty-one patients were enrolled; 84\{%} were African American and 80\{%} were female (mean age: 54 years). Seventy-three percent watched at least one module after the initial visit. Improved self-efficacy was associated with a decrease in concerns about medications (r = −0.64). Low literate patients experienced greater improvement in self-efficacy than more literate patients (t = 2.54, p = 0.02). Patients’ mean number of problems declined from 6.14 to 5.03. The number of patients with high or medium adherence rose from 33\{%} at baseline to 43\{%} at 3-month follow-up. Conclusions A practical, customized video intervention may help improve patient self-efficacy, reduce problems with medication use, and improve medication adherence in diabetes patients. Practice implications Providers should consider implementing technology-based interventions in the clinic to address common problems that patients have with self-management.",
keywords = "African American, Educational video, Health literacy, Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model, Medication problems, Self-efficacy, Self-management",
author = "Davis, {Scott A.} and Delesha Carpenter and Cummings, {Doyle M.} and Charles Lee and Blalock, {Susan J.} and Scott, {Jennifer Elissa} and Lisa Rodebaugh and Ferreri, {Stefanie P.} and Betsy Sleath",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.pec.2016.07.024",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "100",
pages = "174--178",
journal = "Patient Education and Counseling",
issn = "0738-3991",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patient adoption of an internet based diabetes medication tool to improve adherence

T2 - Patient Education and Counseling

AU - Davis,Scott A.

AU - Carpenter,Delesha

AU - Cummings,Doyle M.

AU - Lee,Charles

AU - Blalock,Susan J.

AU - Scott,Jennifer Elissa

AU - Rodebaugh,Lisa

AU - Ferreri,Stefanie P.

AU - Sleath,Betsy

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Objective To investigate the effect of a video intervention, Managing Your Diabetes Medicines, on patient self-efficacy, problems with using medication, and medication adherence in a rural, mostly African American population. Methods Patients selected their problem areas in medication use and watched one of nine 2-min videos with a research assistant at a clinic or pharmacy and were given an access code to watch all the videos at their convenience. Outcomes were measured at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Results Fifty-one patients were enrolled; 84% were African American and 80% were female (mean age: 54 years). Seventy-three percent watched at least one module after the initial visit. Improved self-efficacy was associated with a decrease in concerns about medications (r = −0.64). Low literate patients experienced greater improvement in self-efficacy than more literate patients (t = 2.54, p = 0.02). Patients’ mean number of problems declined from 6.14 to 5.03. The number of patients with high or medium adherence rose from 33% at baseline to 43% at 3-month follow-up. Conclusions A practical, customized video intervention may help improve patient self-efficacy, reduce problems with medication use, and improve medication adherence in diabetes patients. Practice implications Providers should consider implementing technology-based interventions in the clinic to address common problems that patients have with self-management.

AB - Objective To investigate the effect of a video intervention, Managing Your Diabetes Medicines, on patient self-efficacy, problems with using medication, and medication adherence in a rural, mostly African American population. Methods Patients selected their problem areas in medication use and watched one of nine 2-min videos with a research assistant at a clinic or pharmacy and were given an access code to watch all the videos at their convenience. Outcomes were measured at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Results Fifty-one patients were enrolled; 84% were African American and 80% were female (mean age: 54 years). Seventy-three percent watched at least one module after the initial visit. Improved self-efficacy was associated with a decrease in concerns about medications (r = −0.64). Low literate patients experienced greater improvement in self-efficacy than more literate patients (t = 2.54, p = 0.02). Patients’ mean number of problems declined from 6.14 to 5.03. The number of patients with high or medium adherence rose from 33% at baseline to 43% at 3-month follow-up. Conclusions A practical, customized video intervention may help improve patient self-efficacy, reduce problems with medication use, and improve medication adherence in diabetes patients. Practice implications Providers should consider implementing technology-based interventions in the clinic to address common problems that patients have with self-management.

KW - African American

KW - Educational video

KW - Health literacy

KW - Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills Model

KW - Medication problems

KW - Self-efficacy

KW - Self-management

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84997530135&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84997530135&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.pec.2016.07.024

DO - 10.1016/j.pec.2016.07.024

M3 - Article

VL - 100

SP - 174

EP - 178

JO - Patient Education and Counseling

JF - Patient Education and Counseling

SN - 0738-3991

IS - 1

ER -