Medically assisted withdrawal (Detoxification): Considering the mother-infant dyad

Hendrée E. Jones, Mishka Terplan, Marjorie Meyer

Research output: Research - peer-reviewReview article

  • 2 Citations

Abstract

Recommendations for opioid agonist pharmacotherapy and against medically assisted withdrawal were based upon early reports that associated withdrawal with maternal relapse and fetal demise. Data from recent case series have called these recommendations into question. Although these data do not support an association between medically assisted withdrawal and fetal demise, relapse remains a significant clinical concern with reported rates ranging from 17% to 96% (average 48%). Given the high loss to follow-up in these studies, the actual relapse rate is likely even greater. Furthermore, while medically assisted withdrawal is being proposed as a public health strategy to reduce neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), current data do not support a reduction in NAS with medically assisted withdrawal relative to opioid agonist pharmacotherapy. Overall, the data do not support either benefit of medically assisted withdrawal or equivalence to opioid agonist pharmacotherapy for the maternal-newborn dyad. Medically assisted withdrawal increases the risk of maternal relapse and poor treatment engagement and does not improve newborn health. Treatment of chronic maternal disease, including opioid agonist disorder, should be directed toward optimal long-term outcome.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages90-92
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Addiction Medicine
Volume11
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Opioid Analgesics
Mothers
Recurrence
Drug Therapy
Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome
Fetal Death
Therapeutics
Chronic Disease
Public Health
Newborn Infant
Infant Health

Keywords

  • fetus
  • neonatal abstinence syndrome
  • neonate
  • opioid use disorder
  • pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Medically assisted withdrawal (Detoxification) : Considering the mother-infant dyad. / Jones, Hendrée E.; Terplan, Mishka; Meyer, Marjorie.

In: Journal of Addiction Medicine, Vol. 11, No. 2, 2017, p. 90-92.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewReview article

@article{d9cd571c34f647a4b1be423f2110ff7a,
title = "Medically assisted withdrawal (Detoxification): Considering the mother-infant dyad",
abstract = "Recommendations for opioid agonist pharmacotherapy and against medically assisted withdrawal were based upon early reports that associated withdrawal with maternal relapse and fetal demise. Data from recent case series have called these recommendations into question. Although these data do not support an association between medically assisted withdrawal and fetal demise, relapse remains a significant clinical concern with reported rates ranging from 17% to 96% (average 48%). Given the high loss to follow-up in these studies, the actual relapse rate is likely even greater. Furthermore, while medically assisted withdrawal is being proposed as a public health strategy to reduce neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), current data do not support a reduction in NAS with medically assisted withdrawal relative to opioid agonist pharmacotherapy. Overall, the data do not support either benefit of medically assisted withdrawal or equivalence to opioid agonist pharmacotherapy for the maternal-newborn dyad. Medically assisted withdrawal increases the risk of maternal relapse and poor treatment engagement and does not improve newborn health. Treatment of chronic maternal disease, including opioid agonist disorder, should be directed toward optimal long-term outcome.",
keywords = "fetus, neonatal abstinence syndrome, neonate, opioid use disorder, pregnancy",
author = "Jones, {Hendrée E.} and Mishka Terplan and Marjorie Meyer",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1097/ADM.0000000000000289",
volume = "11",
pages = "90--92",
journal = "Journal of Addiction Medicine",
issn = "1932-0620",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Medically assisted withdrawal (Detoxification)

T2 - Journal of Addiction Medicine

AU - Jones,Hendrée E.

AU - Terplan,Mishka

AU - Meyer,Marjorie

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Recommendations for opioid agonist pharmacotherapy and against medically assisted withdrawal were based upon early reports that associated withdrawal with maternal relapse and fetal demise. Data from recent case series have called these recommendations into question. Although these data do not support an association between medically assisted withdrawal and fetal demise, relapse remains a significant clinical concern with reported rates ranging from 17% to 96% (average 48%). Given the high loss to follow-up in these studies, the actual relapse rate is likely even greater. Furthermore, while medically assisted withdrawal is being proposed as a public health strategy to reduce neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), current data do not support a reduction in NAS with medically assisted withdrawal relative to opioid agonist pharmacotherapy. Overall, the data do not support either benefit of medically assisted withdrawal or equivalence to opioid agonist pharmacotherapy for the maternal-newborn dyad. Medically assisted withdrawal increases the risk of maternal relapse and poor treatment engagement and does not improve newborn health. Treatment of chronic maternal disease, including opioid agonist disorder, should be directed toward optimal long-term outcome.

AB - Recommendations for opioid agonist pharmacotherapy and against medically assisted withdrawal were based upon early reports that associated withdrawal with maternal relapse and fetal demise. Data from recent case series have called these recommendations into question. Although these data do not support an association between medically assisted withdrawal and fetal demise, relapse remains a significant clinical concern with reported rates ranging from 17% to 96% (average 48%). Given the high loss to follow-up in these studies, the actual relapse rate is likely even greater. Furthermore, while medically assisted withdrawal is being proposed as a public health strategy to reduce neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), current data do not support a reduction in NAS with medically assisted withdrawal relative to opioid agonist pharmacotherapy. Overall, the data do not support either benefit of medically assisted withdrawal or equivalence to opioid agonist pharmacotherapy for the maternal-newborn dyad. Medically assisted withdrawal increases the risk of maternal relapse and poor treatment engagement and does not improve newborn health. Treatment of chronic maternal disease, including opioid agonist disorder, should be directed toward optimal long-term outcome.

KW - fetus

KW - neonatal abstinence syndrome

KW - neonate

KW - opioid use disorder

KW - pregnancy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85015878238&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85015878238&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/ADM.0000000000000289

DO - 10.1097/ADM.0000000000000289

M3 - Review article

VL - 11

SP - 90

EP - 92

JO - Journal of Addiction Medicine

JF - Journal of Addiction Medicine

SN - 1932-0620

IS - 2

ER -