Low-frequency direct cortical stimulation of left superior frontal gyrus enhances working memory performance

Sankaraleengam Alagapan, Caroline Lustenberger, Eldad J Hadar, Hae Won Shin, Flavio Frӧhlich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The neural substrates of working memory are spread across prefrontal, parietal and cingulate cortices and are thought to be coordinated through low frequency cortical oscillations in the theta (3–8 Hz) and alpha (8–12 Hz) frequency bands. While the functional role of many subregions have been elucidated using neuroimaging studies, the role of superior frontal gyrus (SFG) is not yet clear. Here, we combined electrocorticography and direct cortical stimulation in three patients implanted with subdural electrodes to assess if superior frontal gyrus is indeed involved in working memory. We found left SFG exhibited task-related modulation of oscillations in the theta and alpha frequency bands specifically during the encoding epoch. Stimulation at the frequency matched to the endogenous oscillations resulted in reduced reaction times in all three participants. Our results provide evidence for SFG playing a functional role in working memory and suggest that SFG may coordinate working memory through low-frequency oscillations thus bolstering the feasibility of using intracranial electric stimulation for restoring cognitive function.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages697-706
Number of pages10
JournalNeuroImage
Volume184
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Prefrontal Cortex
Short-Term Memory
Parietal Lobe
Gyrus Cinguli
Neuroimaging
Cognition
Electric Stimulation
Reaction Time
Electrodes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Low-frequency direct cortical stimulation of left superior frontal gyrus enhances working memory performance. / Alagapan, Sankaraleengam; Lustenberger, Caroline; Hadar, Eldad J; Shin, Hae Won; Frӧhlich, Flavio.

In: NeuroImage, Vol. 184, 01.01.2019, p. 697-706.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alagapan, Sankaraleengam ; Lustenberger, Caroline ; Hadar, Eldad J ; Shin, Hae Won ; Frӧhlich, Flavio. / Low-frequency direct cortical stimulation of left superior frontal gyrus enhances working memory performance. In: NeuroImage. 2019 ; Vol. 184. pp. 697-706.
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