Longitudinal Predictors of Criminal Arrest after Traumatic Brain Injury: Results from the Traumatic Brain Injury Model System National Database

Eric B. Elbogen, James R. Wolfe, Michelle Cueva, Connor Sullivan, Jacqueline Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: To examine how pre-traumatic brain injury (TBI) variables and TBI-related characteristics predict post-TBI criminal arrest, using longitudinal data from the Traumatic Brain Injury Model System National Database. Settings: Medical hospitals; rehabilitation facilities. Participants: Participants with documented TBI and nonmissing Traumatic Brain Injury Model System data, resulting in N = 6315 at 1 year post-TBI, N = 4982 at 2 years post-TBI, and N = 2690 at 5 years post-TBI. Design: Prospective cohort study with secondary data analysis of the relationship between pre-TBI/TBI factors and post-TBI criminal arrest as measured at 3 time points. Main Measures: Self-report of post-TBI criminal arrest. Results: Post-TBI criminal arrest was associated with gender, age, marital status, educational attainment, pre-TBI felony, pre-TBI drug abuse, pre-TBI alcohol abuse, and violent cause of TBI. Frontal, temporal, parietal, or occipital lobe lesions from computed tomographic scans did not predict post-TBI criminal arrests. Higher numbers of post-TBI arrests were predicted by loss of consciousness (≥24 hours), combined with retention of motor function. Conclusion: Premorbid variables, especially pre-TBI felonies, were strongly linked to post-TBI criminal arrests. The relationship between TBI and arrest was complex, and different brain functions (eg, physical mobility) should be considered when understanding this association. Findings highlight that for post-TBI criminal behavior, many risk factors mirror those of the non-TBI general population.

LanguageEnglish (US)
PagesE3-E13
JournalJournal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 25 2015

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Databases
Traumatic Brain Injury
Occipital Lobe
Parietal Lobe
Unconsciousness
Marital Status
Temporal Lobe
Information Systems
Brain Injuries
Self Report
Alcoholism
Substance-Related Disorders

Keywords

  • alcohol abuse
  • criminal behavior
  • drug abuse
  • motor function
  • traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Longitudinal Predictors of Criminal Arrest after Traumatic Brain Injury : Results from the Traumatic Brain Injury Model System National Database. / Elbogen, Eric B.; Wolfe, James R.; Cueva, Michelle; Sullivan, Connor; Johnson, Jacqueline.

In: Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, Vol. 30, No. 5, 25.09.2015, p. E3-E13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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