Influences on preschool children's oral health-related quality of life as reported by English and Spanish-speaking parents and caregivers

Catherine D. Born, Kimon Divaris, Leslie P. Zeldin, R. Gary Rozier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: This study examined young, preschool children's oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among a community-based cohort of English and Spanish-speaking parent–child dyads in North Carolina, and sought to quantify the association of parent/caregiver characteristics, including spoken language, with OHRQoL impacts. Methods: Data from structured interviews with 1,111 parents of children aged 6–23 months enrolled in the Zero-Out Early Childhood Caries study in 2010–2012 were used. OHRQoL was measured using the overall score (range: 0–52) of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS). We examined associations with parents' sociodemographic characteristics, spoken language, self-reported oral and general health, oral health knowledge, children's dental attendance, and dental care needs. Analyses included descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate methods based upon zero-inflated negative binomial regression. To determine differences between English and Spanish speakers, language-stratified model estimates were contrasted using homogeneity χ2 tests. Results: The mean overall ECOHIS score was 3.9 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 3.6–4.2]; 4.7 among English-speakers and 1.5 among Spanish speakers. In multivariate analyses, caregivers' education showed a positive association with OHRQoL impacts among Spanish speakers [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.12 (95% CI = 1.03–1.22), for every added year of schooling], whereas caregivers' fair/poor oral health showed a positive association among English speakers (PR = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.02–1.41). Conclusions: The overall severity of ECOHIS impacts was low among this population-based sample of young, preschool children, and substantially lower among Spanish versus English speakers. Further studies are warranted to identify sources of these differences in – actual or reported – OHRQoL impacts.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages276-286
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of public health dentistry
Volume76
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

Fingerprint

Oral Health
Preschool Children
Caregivers
Parents
Quality of Life
Language
Confidence Intervals
Child Health
Dental Care
Tooth
Multivariate Analysis
Interviews
Education

Keywords

  • caregivers
  • children
  • early childhood; cohort studies
  • quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Influences on preschool children's oral health-related quality of life as reported by English and Spanish-speaking parents and caregivers. / Born, Catherine D.; Divaris, Kimon; Zeldin, Leslie P.; Rozier, R. Gary.

In: Journal of public health dentistry, Vol. 76, No. 4, 01.09.2016, p. 276-286.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: This study examined young, preschool children's oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) among a community-based cohort of English and Spanish-speaking parent–child dyads in North Carolina, and sought to quantify the association of parent/caregiver characteristics, including spoken language, with OHRQoL impacts. Methods: Data from structured interviews with 1,111 parents of children aged 6–23 months enrolled in the Zero-Out Early Childhood Caries study in 2010–2012 were used. OHRQoL was measured using the overall score (range: 0–52) of the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS). We examined associations with parents' sociodemographic characteristics, spoken language, self-reported oral and general health, oral health knowledge, children's dental attendance, and dental care needs. Analyses included descriptive, bivariate, and multivariate methods based upon zero-inflated negative binomial regression. To determine differences between English and Spanish speakers, language-stratified model estimates were contrasted using homogeneity χ2 tests. Results: The mean overall ECOHIS score was 3.9 [95{\%} confidence interval (CI) = 3.6–4.2]; 4.7 among English-speakers and 1.5 among Spanish speakers. In multivariate analyses, caregivers' education showed a positive association with OHRQoL impacts among Spanish speakers [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.12 (95{\%} CI = 1.03–1.22), for every added year of schooling], whereas caregivers' fair/poor oral health showed a positive association among English speakers (PR = 1.20; 95{\%} CI = 1.02–1.41). Conclusions: The overall severity of ECOHIS impacts was low among this population-based sample of young, preschool children, and substantially lower among Spanish versus English speakers. Further studies are warranted to identify sources of these differences in – actual or reported – OHRQoL impacts.",
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