Improvement and retention of emergency obstetrics and neonatal care knowledge and skills in a hospital mentorship program in Lilongwe, Malawi

Jennifer H. Tang, Charlotte Kaliti, Angela Bengtson, Sumera Hayat, Eveles Chimala, Rachel MacLeod, Stephen Kaliti, Fanny Sisya, Mwawi Mwale, Jeffrey Wilkinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 2 Citations

Abstract

Objective To evaluate whether a hospital-based mentoring program could significantly increase short- and longer-term emergency obstetrics and neonatal care (EmONC) knowledge and skills among health providers. Methods In a prospective before-and-after study, 20 mentors were trained using a specially-created EmONC mentoring and training program at Bwaila Hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi. The mentors then trained an additional 114 providers as mentees in the curriculum. Mentors and mentees were asked to complete a test before initiation of the training (Pre-Test), immediately after training (Post-Test 1), and at least 6 months after training (Post-Test 2) to assess written and practical EmONC knowledge and skills. Mean scores were then compared. Results Scores increased significantly between the Pre-Test and Post-Test 1 for both written (n = 134; difference 22.9%, P < 0.001) and practical (n = 125; difference 29.5%, P < 0.001) tests. Scores were still significantly higher in Post-Test 2 than in the Pre-Test for written (n = 111; difference 21.0%, P < 0.001) and practical (n = 103; difference 29.3%, P < 0.001) tests. Conclusion A hospital-based mentoring program can result in both short- and longer-term improvement in EmONC knowledge and skills. Further research is required to assess whether this leads to behavioral changes that improve maternal and neonatal outcomes.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages240-243
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume132
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

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Malawi
Mentors
Obstetrics
Emergencies
Curriculum
Mothers
Education
Health
Research
Mentoring

Keywords

  • Emergency obstetrics
  • Malawi
  • Mentoring
  • Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Improvement and retention of emergency obstetrics and neonatal care knowledge and skills in a hospital mentorship program in Lilongwe, Malawi. / Tang, Jennifer H.; Kaliti, Charlotte; Bengtson, Angela; Hayat, Sumera; Chimala, Eveles; MacLeod, Rachel; Kaliti, Stephen; Sisya, Fanny; Mwale, Mwawi; Wilkinson, Jeffrey.

In: International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Vol. 132, No. 2, 01.02.2016, p. 240-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tang, Jennifer H. ; Kaliti, Charlotte ; Bengtson, Angela ; Hayat, Sumera ; Chimala, Eveles ; MacLeod, Rachel ; Kaliti, Stephen ; Sisya, Fanny ; Mwale, Mwawi ; Wilkinson, Jeffrey. / Improvement and retention of emergency obstetrics and neonatal care knowledge and skills in a hospital mentorship program in Lilongwe, Malawi. In: International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2016 ; Vol. 132, No. 2. pp. 240-243.
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