Ideology in America

Christopher Ellis, James A. Stimson

Research output: Book/ReportBook

  • 144 Citations

Abstract

The Ohio ballot of 2004 featured a vote on an amendment banning gay marriage. It passed by a large margin. And the same was true in Arkansas, in Georgia, in Mississippi, in Montana, in North Dakota, in Oklahoma, and in Utah. All of these states, most conservative leaning, had ballot measures, and all were lopsided victories for the anti side of the gay marriage debate. The average vote was about 70% for the ban, 30% against. There was never a large prospect that legal gay marriage was imminent in these states. The bigger story was the possible impact on the election for the president of the United States. The theory was that the ballot measures would mobilize large numbers of culturally conservative usual nonvoters to make a rare trip to the polls and then incidentally vote for George W. Bush, whose campaign was tightly linked to the opposition to gay marriage. The ballot measures did coincide with increased turnout, particularly in more culturally conservative areas. And in Ohio, critical to Bush's Electoral College victory and won with a margin of just over a hundred thousand votes, the increased conservative turnout might have been enough to put Bush over the edge.

LanguageEnglish (US)
PublisherCambridge University Press
Number of pages206
ISBN (Electronic)9781139094009
ISBN (Print)9781107019034
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

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voter
ideology
marriage
ban
amendment
opposition
president
campaign
election

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Ideology in America. / Ellis, Christopher; Stimson, James A.

Cambridge University Press, 2012. 206 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Ellis C, Stimson JA. Ideology in America. Cambridge University Press, 2012. 206 p. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139094009
Ellis, Christopher ; Stimson, James A. / Ideology in America. Cambridge University Press, 2012. 206 p.
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