Glaucoma patient-provider communication about vision quality-of-life

Betsy Sleath, Robyn Sayner, Michelle Vitko, Delesha M. Carpenter, Susan J. Blalock, Kelly W. Muir, Annette L. Giangiacomo, Mary Elizabeth Hartnett, Alan L. Robin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective The purpose of this study was to: (a) describe the extent to which ophthalmologists and glaucoma patients discuss vision quality-of-life during office visits, and (b) examine the association between patient and ophthalmologist characteristics and provider-patient communication about vision quality-of-life. Methods Patients with glaucoma who were newly prescribed or on glaucoma medications were recruited at six ophthalmology clinics. Patients’ visits were video-tape recorded and quality-of-life communication variables were coded. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the data. Results Two hundred and seventy-nine patients participated. Specific glaucoma quality-of-life domains were discussed during only 13% of visits. Older patients were significantly more likely to discuss one or more vision quality-of-life domains than younger patients. African American patients were significantly less likely to make statements about their vision quality-of-life and providers were less likely to ask them one or more vision quality-of-life questions than non-African American patients. Conclusion Eye care providers and patients infrequently discussed the patient's vision quality-of-life during glaucoma visits. African American patients were less likely to communicate about vision quality-of-life than non-African American patients. Practice implications Eye care providers should make sure to discuss vision quality-of-life with glaucoma patients.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages703-709
Number of pages7
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
Volume100
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

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Glaucoma
Communication
Quality of Life
African Americans
Office Visits
Ophthalmology
Patient Care

Keywords

  • Communication
  • Glaucoma
  • Patient question-asking
  • Quality-of-life
  • Vision loss

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Sleath, B., Sayner, R., Vitko, M., Carpenter, D. M., Blalock, S. J., Muir, K. W., ... Robin, A. L. (2017). Glaucoma patient-provider communication about vision quality-of-life. Patient Education and Counseling, 100(4), 703-709. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2016.11.018

Glaucoma patient-provider communication about vision quality-of-life. / Sleath, Betsy; Sayner, Robyn; Vitko, Michelle; Carpenter, Delesha M.; Blalock, Susan J.; Muir, Kelly W.; Giangiacomo, Annette L.; Hartnett, Mary Elizabeth; Robin, Alan L.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 100, No. 4, 01.04.2017, p. 703-709.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sleath, B, Sayner, R, Vitko, M, Carpenter, DM, Blalock, SJ, Muir, KW, Giangiacomo, AL, Hartnett, ME & Robin, AL 2017, 'Glaucoma patient-provider communication about vision quality-of-life' Patient Education and Counseling, vol. 100, no. 4, pp. 703-709. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2016.11.018
Sleath, Betsy ; Sayner, Robyn ; Vitko, Michelle ; Carpenter, Delesha M. ; Blalock, Susan J. ; Muir, Kelly W. ; Giangiacomo, Annette L. ; Hartnett, Mary Elizabeth ; Robin, Alan L. / Glaucoma patient-provider communication about vision quality-of-life. In: Patient Education and Counseling. 2017 ; Vol. 100, No. 4. pp. 703-709.
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