Enhancing Social Support Postincarceration: Results From a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

Carrie Pettus-Davis, Allison Dunnigan, Christopher A. Veeh, Matthew Owen Howard, Anna M. Scheyett, Amelia Roberts-Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: Over 50% of released prisoners are reincarcerated within 3 years. Social support from loved ones postincarceration significantly reduces the likelihood of reincarceration. Increasingly, intervention developers aim to implement interventions that will enhance the stability of support available. This study responds to gaps in knowledge. Method: The current efficacy study reports findings from a randomized controlled trial (n = 57) of a social support intervention. A priori power analysis indicated moderate effect sizes could be detected. Participants were men, average age was 25 years, and over 90% were African American. Preliminary effects on social support, cognitions, substance use, and rearrest were assessed. Recruitment and consent occurred in prison; the intervention and 4 follow-ups occurred postrelease. Results: Findings converge with research indicating declines in social support (b = −.70, p <.05) and perceived quality of support (b =.05, p <.01) over time. Age showed inverse relationships with support (b = −1.77, p <.05). There were no statistically significant group effects for social support, cognitions, substance use (with the exception of marijuana), or recidivism. Clinical implications are discussed. Conclusion: This study advances research on intervention dosage, potency, and measurement considerations.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages1226-1246
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology
Volume73
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2017

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Social Support
Randomized Controlled Trials
Cognition
Prisoners
Prisons
Cannabis
Research
African Americans
Randomized Controlled Trial
Substance Use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Enhancing Social Support Postincarceration : Results From a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial. / Pettus-Davis, Carrie; Dunnigan, Allison; Veeh, Christopher A.; Howard, Matthew Owen; Scheyett, Anna M.; Roberts-Lewis, Amelia.

In: Journal of Clinical Psychology, Vol. 73, No. 10, 01.10.2017, p. 1226-1246.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pettus-Davis, C, Dunnigan, A, Veeh, CA, Howard, MO, Scheyett, AM & Roberts-Lewis, A 2017, 'Enhancing Social Support Postincarceration: Results From a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial' Journal of Clinical Psychology, vol. 73, no. 10, pp. 1226-1246. https://doi.org/10.1002/jclp.22442
Pettus-Davis, Carrie ; Dunnigan, Allison ; Veeh, Christopher A. ; Howard, Matthew Owen ; Scheyett, Anna M. ; Roberts-Lewis, Amelia. / Enhancing Social Support Postincarceration : Results From a Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial. In: Journal of Clinical Psychology. 2017 ; Vol. 73, No. 10. pp. 1226-1246.
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