Engineering well-characterized PEG-coated nanoparticles for elucidating biological barriers to drug delivery

Qi Yang, Samuel K. Lai

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings can substantially reduce nanoparticle uptake and clearance by immune cells as well as nonspecific interactions with the biological environment, thus potentially improving nanoparticle circulation times and biodistribution in target tissues such as tumors. Naturally, the “stealth” properties of PEG coatings are critically dependent on the density and conformation of surface PEG chains. However, there are significant technical hurdles to both generating sufficiently dense PEG coatings on nanoparticles and precisely characterizing their PEG grafting densities. Here, we describe methods for preparing PEGylated polymeric nanoparticles with precisely tunable PEG coatings without the use of organic solvents, quantifying PEGylation efficiency and density using a standard fluorescence assay, and evaluating nanoparticle uptake by immune cells using flow cytometry.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMethods in Molecular Biology
PublisherHumana Press Inc.
Pages125-137
Number of pages13
Volume1530
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Publication series

NameMethods in Molecular Biology
Volume1530
ISSN (Print)1064-3745

Fingerprint

Nanoparticles
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Ethylene Glycol
Flow Cytometry
Fluorescence
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Macrophage uptake
  • Nanoparticles
  • PEG conformation
  • PEG density
  • Poly(ethylene glycol)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Yang, Q., & Lai, S. K. (2017). Engineering well-characterized PEG-coated nanoparticles for elucidating biological barriers to drug delivery. In Methods in Molecular Biology (Vol. 1530, pp. 125-137). (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 1530). Humana Press Inc.. DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4939-6646-2_8

Engineering well-characterized PEG-coated nanoparticles for elucidating biological barriers to drug delivery. / Yang, Qi; Lai, Samuel K.

Methods in Molecular Biology. Vol. 1530 Humana Press Inc., 2017. p. 125-137 (Methods in Molecular Biology; Vol. 1530).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Yang, Q & Lai, SK 2017, Engineering well-characterized PEG-coated nanoparticles for elucidating biological barriers to drug delivery. in Methods in Molecular Biology. vol. 1530, Methods in Molecular Biology, vol. 1530, Humana Press Inc., pp. 125-137. DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4939-6646-2_8
Yang Q, Lai SK. Engineering well-characterized PEG-coated nanoparticles for elucidating biological barriers to drug delivery. In Methods in Molecular Biology. Vol. 1530. Humana Press Inc.2017. p. 125-137. (Methods in Molecular Biology). Available from, DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4939-6646-2_8
Yang, Qi ; Lai, Samuel K./ Engineering well-characterized PEG-coated nanoparticles for elucidating biological barriers to drug delivery. Methods in Molecular Biology. Vol. 1530 Humana Press Inc., 2017. pp. 125-137 (Methods in Molecular Biology).
@inbook{a10c36c9b1234568bba453c826daa55d,
title = "Engineering well-characterized PEG-coated nanoparticles for elucidating biological barriers to drug delivery",
abstract = "Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings can substantially reduce nanoparticle uptake and clearance by immune cells as well as nonspecific interactions with the biological environment, thus potentially improving nanoparticle circulation times and biodistribution in target tissues such as tumors. Naturally, the “stealth” properties of PEG coatings are critically dependent on the density and conformation of surface PEG chains. However, there are significant technical hurdles to both generating sufficiently dense PEG coatings on nanoparticles and precisely characterizing their PEG grafting densities. Here, we describe methods for preparing PEGylated polymeric nanoparticles with precisely tunable PEG coatings without the use of organic solvents, quantifying PEGylation efficiency and density using a standard fluorescence assay, and evaluating nanoparticle uptake by immune cells using flow cytometry.",
keywords = "Macrophage uptake, Nanoparticles, PEG conformation, PEG density, Poly(ethylene glycol)",
author = "Qi Yang and Lai, {Samuel K.}",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/978-1-4939-6646-2_8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "1530",
series = "Methods in Molecular Biology",
publisher = "Humana Press Inc.",
pages = "125--137",
booktitle = "Methods in Molecular Biology",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Engineering well-characterized PEG-coated nanoparticles for elucidating biological barriers to drug delivery

AU - Yang,Qi

AU - Lai,Samuel K.

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings can substantially reduce nanoparticle uptake and clearance by immune cells as well as nonspecific interactions with the biological environment, thus potentially improving nanoparticle circulation times and biodistribution in target tissues such as tumors. Naturally, the “stealth” properties of PEG coatings are critically dependent on the density and conformation of surface PEG chains. However, there are significant technical hurdles to both generating sufficiently dense PEG coatings on nanoparticles and precisely characterizing their PEG grafting densities. Here, we describe methods for preparing PEGylated polymeric nanoparticles with precisely tunable PEG coatings without the use of organic solvents, quantifying PEGylation efficiency and density using a standard fluorescence assay, and evaluating nanoparticle uptake by immune cells using flow cytometry.

AB - Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings can substantially reduce nanoparticle uptake and clearance by immune cells as well as nonspecific interactions with the biological environment, thus potentially improving nanoparticle circulation times and biodistribution in target tissues such as tumors. Naturally, the “stealth” properties of PEG coatings are critically dependent on the density and conformation of surface PEG chains. However, there are significant technical hurdles to both generating sufficiently dense PEG coatings on nanoparticles and precisely characterizing their PEG grafting densities. Here, we describe methods for preparing PEGylated polymeric nanoparticles with precisely tunable PEG coatings without the use of organic solvents, quantifying PEGylation efficiency and density using a standard fluorescence assay, and evaluating nanoparticle uptake by immune cells using flow cytometry.

KW - Macrophage uptake

KW - Nanoparticles

KW - PEG conformation

KW - PEG density

KW - Poly(ethylene glycol)

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85011581616&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85011581616&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/978-1-4939-6646-2_8

DO - 10.1007/978-1-4939-6646-2_8

M3 - Chapter

VL - 1530

T3 - Methods in Molecular Biology

SP - 125

EP - 137

BT - Methods in Molecular Biology

PB - Humana Press Inc.

ER -