Electronic toxicity monitoring and patient-reported outcomes

Ethan M. Basch, Bryce B. Reeve, Sandra A. Mitchell, Stephen B. Clauser, Lori Minasian, Laura Sit, Ram Chilukuri, Paul Baumgartner, Lauren Rogak, Emily Blauel, Amy P. Abernethy, Deborah Bruner

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

  • 33 Citations

Abstract

Understanding the potential profile of adverse events associated with cancer treatment is essential in balancing safety versus benefits. Multiple stakeholders make use of this information for decision making, including patients, clinicians, researchers, regulators, and payors. Currently, adverse events are reported by clinical research staff, yet evidence suggests that this may contribute to underreporting of symptom events. Direct patient reporting via electronic interfaces offers a promising mechanism to enhance the efficiency and precision of our current approach and may complement clinician reports of adverse events. The National Cancer Institute has contracted to develop and test an item bank and software system for directly eliciting adverse symptom event information from patients in cancer clinical research, called the Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. The validity, usability, and scalability of the Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events prototype are currently being examined in academic and community-based settings.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages231-234
Number of pages4
JournalCancer Journal
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011

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Terminology
Second Primary Neoplasms
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Research
Decision Making
Software
Research Personnel
Safety
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • adverse event
  • CTCAE
  • patient-reported outcome
  • PRO
  • PRO-CTCAE
  • symptom
  • tolerability
  • toxicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Basch, E. M., Reeve, B. B., Mitchell, S. A., Clauser, S. B., Minasian, L., Sit, L., ... Bruner, D. (2011). Electronic toxicity monitoring and patient-reported outcomes. Cancer Journal, 17(4), 231-234. https://doi.org/10.1097/PPO.0b013e31822c28b3

Electronic toxicity monitoring and patient-reported outcomes. / Basch, Ethan M.; Reeve, Bryce B.; Mitchell, Sandra A.; Clauser, Stephen B.; Minasian, Lori; Sit, Laura; Chilukuri, Ram; Baumgartner, Paul; Rogak, Lauren; Blauel, Emily; Abernethy, Amy P.; Bruner, Deborah.

In: Cancer Journal, Vol. 17, No. 4, 01.07.2011, p. 231-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Basch, EM, Reeve, BB, Mitchell, SA, Clauser, SB, Minasian, L, Sit, L, Chilukuri, R, Baumgartner, P, Rogak, L, Blauel, E, Abernethy, AP & Bruner, D 2011, 'Electronic toxicity monitoring and patient-reported outcomes', Cancer Journal, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 231-234. https://doi.org/10.1097/PPO.0b013e31822c28b3
Basch, Ethan M. ; Reeve, Bryce B. ; Mitchell, Sandra A. ; Clauser, Stephen B. ; Minasian, Lori ; Sit, Laura ; Chilukuri, Ram ; Baumgartner, Paul ; Rogak, Lauren ; Blauel, Emily ; Abernethy, Amy P. ; Bruner, Deborah. / Electronic toxicity monitoring and patient-reported outcomes. In: Cancer Journal. 2011 ; Vol. 17, No. 4. pp. 231-234.
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