Effects of prenatal exposure to endocrine disruptors and toxic metals on the fetal epigenome

Paige A. Bommarito, Elizabeth Martin, Rebecca C. Fry

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

  • 4 Citations

Abstract

Exposure to environmental contaminants during pregnancy has been linked to adverse outcomes at birth and later in life. The link between prenatal exposures and latent health outcomes suggests that these exposures may result in long-term epigenetic reprogramming. Toxic metals and endocrine disruptors are two major classes of contaminants that are ubiquitously present in the environment and represent threats to human health. In this review, we present evidence that prenatal exposures to these contaminants result in fetal epigenomic changes, including altered global DNA methylation, gene-specific CpG methylation and microRNA expression. Importantly, these changes may have functional cellular consequences, impacting health outcomes later in life. Therefore, these epigenetic changes represent a critical mechanism that warrants further study.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages333-350
Number of pages18
JournalEpigenomics
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Fingerprint

Endocrine Disruptors
Poisons
Epigenomics
Metals
Health
Environmental Exposure
DNA Methylation
MicroRNAs
Methylation
Parturition
Pregnancy
Genes

Keywords

  • DNA methylation
  • endocrine disruptors
  • environmental exposure
  • epigenetics
  • fetal epigenome
  • in utero
  • prenatal
  • toxic metals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Effects of prenatal exposure to endocrine disruptors and toxic metals on the fetal epigenome. / Bommarito, Paige A.; Martin, Elizabeth; Fry, Rebecca C.

In: Epigenomics, Vol. 9, No. 3, 01.03.2017, p. 333-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Bommarito, Paige A. ; Martin, Elizabeth ; Fry, Rebecca C./ Effects of prenatal exposure to endocrine disruptors and toxic metals on the fetal epigenome. In: Epigenomics. 2017 ; Vol. 9, No. 3. pp. 333-350
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