Effects of perfluorinated chemicals on thyroid function, markers of ovarian reserve, and natural fertility

Natalie M. Crawford, Suzanne E. Fenton, Mark Strynar, Erin P. Hines, David A. Pritchard, Anne Z. Steiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) can act as endocrine-disrupting chemicals, but there has been limited study of their effects on ovarian reserve or fecundability. 99 women, 30–44 years old, without infertility were followed until pregnancy. Initially, serum was evaluated for Antimullerian hormone (AMH), thyroid hormones: thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroxine (T4), free thyroxine (fT4), and triiodothyronine (T3), and PFCs: perfluorooctanoate (PFOA), perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), and perfluorohexanesulfonic acid (PFHxS). Bivariate analyses assessed the relationship between thyroid hormones, AMH, and PFCs. Fecundability ratios (FR) were determined for each PFC using a discrete time-varying Cox model and a day-specific probability model. PFC levels were positively correlated with each other (r 0.24–0.90), but there was no correlation with TSH (r 0.02–0.15) or AMH (r −0.01 to −0.15). FR point estimates for each PFC were neither strong nor statistically significant. Although increased exposure to PFCs correlates with thyroid hormone levels, there is no significant association with fecundability or ovarian reserve.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages53-59
Number of pages7
JournalReproductive Toxicology
Volume69
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

Anti-Mullerian Hormone
Fertility
Thyroid Gland
Thyroid Hormones
perfluorooctanoic acid
Thyrotropin
Thyroxine
Endocrine Disruptors
Triiodothyronine
Proportional Hazards Models
Infertility
Pregnancy
Ovarian Reserve
Serum

Keywords

  • Endocrine disrupting chemicals
  • Fecundability
  • Ovarian reserve
  • Perfluorinated chemicals
  • Thyroid hormones

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology

Cite this

Effects of perfluorinated chemicals on thyroid function, markers of ovarian reserve, and natural fertility. / Crawford, Natalie M.; Fenton, Suzanne E.; Strynar, Mark; Hines, Erin P.; Pritchard, David A.; Steiner, Anne Z.

In: Reproductive Toxicology, Vol. 69, 01.04.2017, p. 53-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Crawford, Natalie M. ; Fenton, Suzanne E. ; Strynar, Mark ; Hines, Erin P. ; Pritchard, David A. ; Steiner, Anne Z./ Effects of perfluorinated chemicals on thyroid function, markers of ovarian reserve, and natural fertility. In: Reproductive Toxicology. 2017 ; Vol. 69. pp. 53-59
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