Disaster medicine training survey results for dental health care providers in Illinois

Michael D. Colvard, Melissa I. Naiman, Danielle Mata, Geoffrey A. Cordell, Lewis Lampiris

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

  • 14 Citations

Abstract

Background. Ongoing vigilance by governments, public health agencies and health care professionals monitoring potential epidemic and pandemic out-breaks, terrorist threats and ever-present natural disasters requires the continuous evolution of comprehensivedisaster response plans and teams, which include the integration of oral health care professionals. Methods. The authors conducted a study in which oral health care professionals assessed their training in the American Medical Association's (AMA's) National Disaster Life Support (NDLS) courses. At the conclusion of each instructional session, the authors asked participants to complete an anonymous course evaluation form to report their impressions of the training activity. The authors included in the analysis those evaluations associated with sessions attended almost exclusively by dentists and hygienists. Results. The authors derived descriptive statistics from the selected course evaluations. Overall, oral health care professionals believed that the Core Disaster Life Support (CDLS) and Basic Disaster Life Support (BDLS) courses were of great educational value, rating course impact at 9.50 and 9.29, respectively, on a scale from 1 to 10. Conclusions. Statistical evaluation instruments reveal satisfaction with the all-hazards awareness training received through the AMA's NDLS disaster medicine training curriculum. Licensed oral health care professionals in Illinois accepted the utility and merits of, and benefited from, the fourhour CDLS and eight-hour BDLS certification programs. Practice Implications. Dental professionals in Illinois require minimal additional training for dental emergency responder duties. The AMA's NDLS curriculum provides effective preparation for dental professionals.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages519-524
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Dental Association
Volume138
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

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Disaster Medicine
Dental Care
Disasters
Health Personnel
Oral Health
Delivery of Health Care
American Medical Association
Tooth
Curriculum
Emergency Responders
Surveys and Questionnaires
Certification
Pandemics
Dentists
Teaching
Public Health

Keywords

  • Basic disaster life support
  • Core disaster life support
  • Dental emergency responder
  • Disaster medicine training
  • Pandemic training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Disaster medicine training survey results for dental health care providers in Illinois. / Colvard, Michael D.; Naiman, Melissa I.; Mata, Danielle; Cordell, Geoffrey A.; Lampiris, Lewis.

In: Journal of the American Dental Association, Vol. 138, No. 4, 01.01.2007, p. 519-524.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Colvard, Michael D. ; Naiman, Melissa I. ; Mata, Danielle ; Cordell, Geoffrey A. ; Lampiris, Lewis. / Disaster medicine training survey results for dental health care providers in Illinois. In: Journal of the American Dental Association. 2007 ; Vol. 138, No. 4. pp. 519-524
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