DICOM: a standard for medical imaging

Steven C M D Horii, W. D M D Bidgood

Research output: ResearchConference contribution

  • 5 Citations

Abstract

Since 1983, the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) have been engaged in developing standards related to medical imaging. This alliance of users and manufacturers was formed to meet the needs of the medical imaging community as its use of digital imaging technology increased. The development of electronic picture archiving and communications systems (PACS), which could connect a number of medical imaging devices together in a network, led to the need for a standard interface and data structure for use on imaging equipment. Since medical image files tend to be very large and include much text information along with the image, the need for a fast, flexible, and extensible standard was quickly established. The ACR-NEMA Digital Imaging and Communications Standards Committee developed a standard which met these needs. The standard (ACR-NEMA 300-1988) was first published in 1985 and revised in 1988. It is increasingly available from equipment manufacturers. The current work of the ACR- NEMA Committee has been to extend the standard to incorporate direct network connection features, and build on standards work done by the International Standards Organization in its Open Systems Interconnection series. This new standard, called Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM), follows an object-oriented design methodology and makes use of as many existing internationally accepted standards as possible. This paper gives a brief overview of the requirements for communications standards in medical imaging, a history of the ACR-NEMA effort and what it has produced, and a description of the DICOM standard.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
PublisherPubl by Int Soc for Optical Engineering
Pages87-102
Number of pages16
Volume1785
ISBN (Print)0819409642
StatePublished - 1993
EventEnabling Technologies for High-Bandwidth Applications - Boston, MA, USA
Duration: Sep 8 1992Sep 8 1992

Other

OtherEnabling Technologies for High-Bandwidth Applications
CityBoston, MA, USA
Period9/8/929/8/92

Fingerprint

Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM)
Medical imaging
medicine
communication
Radiology
radiology
Imaging techniques
Communication
Picture archiving and communication systems
Open systems
Data structures
data structures
files
telecommunication
histories
methodology
requirements
electronics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Horii, S. C. M. D., & Bidgood, W. D. M. D. (1993). DICOM: a standard for medical imaging. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 1785, pp. 87-102). Publ by Int Soc for Optical Engineering.

DICOM : a standard for medical imaging. / Horii, Steven C M D; Bidgood, W. D M D.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 1785 Publ by Int Soc for Optical Engineering, 1993. p. 87-102.

Research output: ResearchConference contribution

Horii, SCMD & Bidgood, WDMD 1993, DICOM: a standard for medical imaging. in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 1785, Publ by Int Soc for Optical Engineering, pp. 87-102, Enabling Technologies for High-Bandwidth Applications, Boston, MA, USA, 9/8/92.
Horii SCMD, Bidgood WDMD. DICOM: a standard for medical imaging. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 1785. Publ by Int Soc for Optical Engineering. 1993. p. 87-102.
Horii, Steven C M D ; Bidgood, W. D M D. / DICOM : a standard for medical imaging. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 1785 Publ by Int Soc for Optical Engineering, 1993. pp. 87-102
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