Development and pilot test of the workplace readiness questionnaire, a theory-based instrument to measure small workplaces' readiness to implement wellness programs

Peggy A. Hannon, Christian D. Helfrich, K. Gary Chan, Claire L. Allen, Kristen Hammerback, Marlana J. Kohn, Amanda T. Parrish, Bryan J. Weiner, Jeffrey R. Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 4 Citations

Abstract

Purpose. To develop a theory-based questionnaire to assess readiness for change in small workplaces adopting wellness programs. Design. In developing our scale, we first tested items via "think-aloud" interviews. We tested the revised items in a cross-sectional quantitative telephone survey. Setting. The study setting comprised small workplaces (20-250 employees) in low-wage industries. Subjects. Decision-makers representing small workplaces in King County, Washington (think-aloud interviews, n = 9), and the United States (telephone survey, n = 201) served as study subjects. Measures. We generated items for each construct in Weiner's theory of organizational readiness for change. We also measured workplace characteristics and current implementation of workplace wellness programs. Analysis. We assessed reliability by coefficient alpha for each of the readiness questionnaire subscales. We tested the association of all subscales with employers' current implementation of wellness policies, programs, and communications, and conducted a path analysis to test the associations in the theory of organizational readiness to change. Results. Each of the readiness subscales exhibited acceptable internal reliability (coefficient alpha range,.75-.88) and was positively associated with wellness program implementation (p <.05). The path analysis was consistent with the theory of organizational readiness to change, except change efficacy did not predict change-related effort. Conclusion. We developed a new questionnaire to assess small workplaces' readiness to adopt and implement evidence-based wellness programs. Our findings also provide empirical validation of Weiner's theory of readiness for change.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages67-75
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Promotion
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Health Promotion
Workplace
workplace
questionnaire
path analysis
Telephone
telephone
Interviews
Organizational Innovation
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
low wage
interview
Surveys and Questionnaires
decision maker
Industry
employer
communications
employee
industry
evidence

Keywords

  • and weight control
  • culture change
  • Health focus: fitness/physical activity
  • Measure Development
  • nutrition
  • Outcome measure: cognitive and behavioral
  • Prevention Research. Manuscript format: research
  • Readiness for Change
  • Research purpose: instrument development
  • Setting: workplace
  • smoking control
  • Strategy: policy
  • Study design: nonexperimental
  • Target population circumstances: education/income level
  • Target population: adults
  • Workplace Health Promotion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Development and pilot test of the workplace readiness questionnaire, a theory-based instrument to measure small workplaces' readiness to implement wellness programs. / Hannon, Peggy A.; Helfrich, Christian D.; Chan, K. Gary; Allen, Claire L.; Hammerback, Kristen; Kohn, Marlana J.; Parrish, Amanda T.; Weiner, Bryan J.; Harris, Jeffrey R.

In: American Journal of Health Promotion, Vol. 31, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 67-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hannon, Peggy A. ; Helfrich, Christian D. ; Chan, K. Gary ; Allen, Claire L. ; Hammerback, Kristen ; Kohn, Marlana J. ; Parrish, Amanda T. ; Weiner, Bryan J. ; Harris, Jeffrey R./ Development and pilot test of the workplace readiness questionnaire, a theory-based instrument to measure small workplaces' readiness to implement wellness programs. In: American Journal of Health Promotion. 2017 ; Vol. 31, No. 1. pp. 67-75
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