Defining cancer survivors, their needs, and perspectives on survivorship health care in the USA

Deborah K. Mayer, Shelly Fuld Nasso, Jo Anne Earp

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

  • 20 Citations

Abstract

More people are living after a diagnosis of cancer than ever before and now account for around 5% of the US population. The specialty of cancer survivorship has been developing and growing since the mid-1980s, but the term survivor is open to debate by people living with cancer and those caring for them. Regardless of the term used, many ongoing physical, psychological, and social needs affect quality of life for people who are living with cancer and those who have survived the disease. Survivors prefer to have these needs addressed by their oncologist but also want their primary care provider to have a role. However, survivors also believe there are communication and coordination barriers between care providers. The existing method for delivering cancer care is becoming unsustainable and is not adequately configured to deliver high-quality cancer care to this growing population in the USA, especially when confronted with projected health-care shortages by 2020. In this Series paper, we define the term cancer survivor, discuss survivors' ongoing needs and preferences for care over time, and consider the implications for delivering coordinated cancer care in the USA.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pagese11-e18
JournalThe Lancet Oncology
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Survivors
Survival Rate
Delivery of Health Care
Neoplasms
Communication Barriers
Quality of Health Care
Population
Primary Health Care
Quality of Life
Psychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Defining cancer survivors, their needs, and perspectives on survivorship health care in the USA. / Mayer, Deborah K.; Nasso, Shelly Fuld; Earp, Jo Anne.

In: The Lancet Oncology, Vol. 18, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. e11-e18.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{60fbfa91572d4c7db857414f45d0744e,
title = "Defining cancer survivors, their needs, and perspectives on survivorship health care in the USA",
abstract = "More people are living after a diagnosis of cancer than ever before and now account for around 5{\%} of the US population. The specialty of cancer survivorship has been developing and growing since the mid-1980s, but the term survivor is open to debate by people living with cancer and those caring for them. Regardless of the term used, many ongoing physical, psychological, and social needs affect quality of life for people who are living with cancer and those who have survived the disease. Survivors prefer to have these needs addressed by their oncologist but also want their primary care provider to have a role. However, survivors also believe there are communication and coordination barriers between care providers. The existing method for delivering cancer care is becoming unsustainable and is not adequately configured to deliver high-quality cancer care to this growing population in the USA, especially when confronted with projected health-care shortages by 2020. In this Series paper, we define the term cancer survivor, discuss survivors' ongoing needs and preferences for care over time, and consider the implications for delivering coordinated cancer care in the USA.",
author = "Mayer, {Deborah K.} and Nasso, {Shelly Fuld} and Earp, {Jo Anne}",
year = "2017",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S1470-2045(16)30573-3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "18",
pages = "e11--e18",
journal = "The Lancet Oncology",
issn = "1470-2045",
publisher = "Lancet Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Defining cancer survivors, their needs, and perspectives on survivorship health care in the USA

AU - Mayer,Deborah K.

AU - Nasso,Shelly Fuld

AU - Earp,Jo Anne

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - More people are living after a diagnosis of cancer than ever before and now account for around 5% of the US population. The specialty of cancer survivorship has been developing and growing since the mid-1980s, but the term survivor is open to debate by people living with cancer and those caring for them. Regardless of the term used, many ongoing physical, psychological, and social needs affect quality of life for people who are living with cancer and those who have survived the disease. Survivors prefer to have these needs addressed by their oncologist but also want their primary care provider to have a role. However, survivors also believe there are communication and coordination barriers between care providers. The existing method for delivering cancer care is becoming unsustainable and is not adequately configured to deliver high-quality cancer care to this growing population in the USA, especially when confronted with projected health-care shortages by 2020. In this Series paper, we define the term cancer survivor, discuss survivors' ongoing needs and preferences for care over time, and consider the implications for delivering coordinated cancer care in the USA.

AB - More people are living after a diagnosis of cancer than ever before and now account for around 5% of the US population. The specialty of cancer survivorship has been developing and growing since the mid-1980s, but the term survivor is open to debate by people living with cancer and those caring for them. Regardless of the term used, many ongoing physical, psychological, and social needs affect quality of life for people who are living with cancer and those who have survived the disease. Survivors prefer to have these needs addressed by their oncologist but also want their primary care provider to have a role. However, survivors also believe there are communication and coordination barriers between care providers. The existing method for delivering cancer care is becoming unsustainable and is not adequately configured to deliver high-quality cancer care to this growing population in the USA, especially when confronted with projected health-care shortages by 2020. In this Series paper, we define the term cancer survivor, discuss survivors' ongoing needs and preferences for care over time, and consider the implications for delivering coordinated cancer care in the USA.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85007452325&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85007452325&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S1470-2045(16)30573-3

DO - 10.1016/S1470-2045(16)30573-3

M3 - Review article

VL - 18

SP - e11-e18

JO - The Lancet Oncology

T2 - The Lancet Oncology

JF - The Lancet Oncology

SN - 1470-2045

IS - 1

ER -