Controlling feeding practices and maternal migrant background: An analysis of a multicultural sample

Maria Somaraki, Karin Eli, Anna Ek, Louise Lindberg, Jonna Nyman, Claude Marcus, Carl Erik Flodmark, Angelo Pietrobelli, Myles S. Faith, Kimmo Sorjonen, Paulina Nowicka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective Parental feeding practices shape children's relationships with food and eating. Feeding is embedded socioculturally in values and attitudes related to food and parenting. However, few studies have examined associations between parental feeding practices and migrant background. Design Cross-sectional study. Parental feeding practices (restriction, pressure to eat, monitoring) were assessed using the Child Feeding Questionnaire. Differences were explored in four sub-samples grouped by maternal place of birth: Sweden, Nordic/Western Europe, Eastern/Southern Europe and countries outside Europe. Crude, partly and fully adjusted linear regression models were created. Potential confounding variables included child's age, gender and weight status, and mother's age, weight status, education and concern about child weight. Setting Malmö and Stockholm, Sweden. Subjects Mothers (n 1325, representing seventy-three countries; mean age 36·5 years; 28·1 % of non-Swedish background; 30·7 % with overweight/obesity; 62·8 % with university education) of pre-school children (mean age 4·8 years; 50·8 % boys; 18·6 % with overweight/obesity). Results Non-Swedish-born mothers, whether European-born or non-European-born, were more likely to use restriction. Swedish-born mothers and Nordic/Western European-born mothers reported lower levels of pressure to eat compared with mothers born in Eastern/Southern Europe and mothers born outside Europe. Differences in monitoring were small. Among the potential confounding variables, child weight status and concern about child weight were highly influential. Concern about child weight accounted for some of the effect of maternal origin on restriction. Conclusions Non-European-born mothers were more concerned about children being overweight and more likely to report controlling feeding practices. Future research should examine acculturative and structural factors underlying differences in feeding.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages848-858
Number of pages11
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

Mothers
Weights and Measures
Eastern Europe
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Sweden
Linear Models
Obesity
Education
Pressure
Food
Parenting
Cross-Sectional Studies
Eating

Keywords

  • Feeding practices
  • Migration
  • Obesity
  • Pre-school children

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Somaraki, M., Eli, K., Ek, A., Lindberg, L., Nyman, J., Marcus, C., ... Nowicka, P. (2017). Controlling feeding practices and maternal migrant background: An analysis of a multicultural sample. Public Health Nutrition, 20(5), 848-858. DOI: 10.1017/S1368980016002834

Controlling feeding practices and maternal migrant background : An analysis of a multicultural sample. / Somaraki, Maria; Eli, Karin; Ek, Anna; Lindberg, Louise; Nyman, Jonna; Marcus, Claude; Flodmark, Carl Erik; Pietrobelli, Angelo; Faith, Myles S.; Sorjonen, Kimmo; Nowicka, Paulina.

In: Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 20, No. 5, 01.04.2017, p. 848-858.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Somaraki, M, Eli, K, Ek, A, Lindberg, L, Nyman, J, Marcus, C, Flodmark, CE, Pietrobelli, A, Faith, MS, Sorjonen, K & Nowicka, P 2017, 'Controlling feeding practices and maternal migrant background: An analysis of a multicultural sample' Public Health Nutrition, vol. 20, no. 5, pp. 848-858. DOI: 10.1017/S1368980016002834
Somaraki M, Eli K, Ek A, Lindberg L, Nyman J, Marcus C et al. Controlling feeding practices and maternal migrant background: An analysis of a multicultural sample. Public Health Nutrition. 2017 Apr 1;20(5):848-858. Available from, DOI: 10.1017/S1368980016002834
Somaraki, Maria ; Eli, Karin ; Ek, Anna ; Lindberg, Louise ; Nyman, Jonna ; Marcus, Claude ; Flodmark, Carl Erik ; Pietrobelli, Angelo ; Faith, Myles S. ; Sorjonen, Kimmo ; Nowicka, Paulina. / Controlling feeding practices and maternal migrant background : An analysis of a multicultural sample. In: Public Health Nutrition. 2017 ; Vol. 20, No. 5. pp. 848-858
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abstract = "Objective Parental feeding practices shape children's relationships with food and eating. Feeding is embedded socioculturally in values and attitudes related to food and parenting. However, few studies have examined associations between parental feeding practices and migrant background. Design Cross-sectional study. Parental feeding practices (restriction, pressure to eat, monitoring) were assessed using the Child Feeding Questionnaire. Differences were explored in four sub-samples grouped by maternal place of birth: Sweden, Nordic/Western Europe, Eastern/Southern Europe and countries outside Europe. Crude, partly and fully adjusted linear regression models were created. Potential confounding variables included child's age, gender and weight status, and mother's age, weight status, education and concern about child weight. Setting Malm{\"o} and Stockholm, Sweden. Subjects Mothers (n 1325, representing seventy-three countries; mean age 36·5 years; 28·1 {\%} of non-Swedish background; 30·7 {\%} with overweight/obesity; 62·8 {\%} with university education) of pre-school children (mean age 4·8 years; 50·8 {\%} boys; 18·6 {\%} with overweight/obesity). Results Non-Swedish-born mothers, whether European-born or non-European-born, were more likely to use restriction. Swedish-born mothers and Nordic/Western European-born mothers reported lower levels of pressure to eat compared with mothers born in Eastern/Southern Europe and mothers born outside Europe. Differences in monitoring were small. Among the potential confounding variables, child weight status and concern about child weight were highly influential. Concern about child weight accounted for some of the effect of maternal origin on restriction. Conclusions Non-European-born mothers were more concerned about children being overweight and more likely to report controlling feeding practices. Future research should examine acculturative and structural factors underlying differences in feeding.",
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AB - Objective Parental feeding practices shape children's relationships with food and eating. Feeding is embedded socioculturally in values and attitudes related to food and parenting. However, few studies have examined associations between parental feeding practices and migrant background. Design Cross-sectional study. Parental feeding practices (restriction, pressure to eat, monitoring) were assessed using the Child Feeding Questionnaire. Differences were explored in four sub-samples grouped by maternal place of birth: Sweden, Nordic/Western Europe, Eastern/Southern Europe and countries outside Europe. Crude, partly and fully adjusted linear regression models were created. Potential confounding variables included child's age, gender and weight status, and mother's age, weight status, education and concern about child weight. Setting Malmö and Stockholm, Sweden. Subjects Mothers (n 1325, representing seventy-three countries; mean age 36·5 years; 28·1 % of non-Swedish background; 30·7 % with overweight/obesity; 62·8 % with university education) of pre-school children (mean age 4·8 years; 50·8 % boys; 18·6 % with overweight/obesity). Results Non-Swedish-born mothers, whether European-born or non-European-born, were more likely to use restriction. Swedish-born mothers and Nordic/Western European-born mothers reported lower levels of pressure to eat compared with mothers born in Eastern/Southern Europe and mothers born outside Europe. Differences in monitoring were small. Among the potential confounding variables, child weight status and concern about child weight were highly influential. Concern about child weight accounted for some of the effect of maternal origin on restriction. Conclusions Non-European-born mothers were more concerned about children being overweight and more likely to report controlling feeding practices. Future research should examine acculturative and structural factors underlying differences in feeding.

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