Clinical application of morcellation: Provider perceptions survey (the CAMPPS Study)

Michelle Louie, Janelle K. Moulder, Nicole Donnellan, Hye Chun Hur, Matthew T. Siedhoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The goal of this research was to explore physicians' perceptions of uterine morcellation and minimally invasive hysterectomy in the setting of new hospital regulations, comparing gynecologists and internal medicine providers, geographic locations, and levels of training. Design: This was a multicenter cross-sectional study. Materials and Methods: A 17-question, anonymous, electronic survey was administered to resident, fellow, and attending gynecologists, and internal medicine physicians at three institutions. Results: Two hundred and twenty-two gynecologists responded for a response rate of 46%. Most gynecologists believe morcellation is safe and acceptable, and the benefits of minimally invasive surgery outweigh the potential risk of cancer dissemination as a result of morcellation. The majority reported that the incidence of occult leiomyosarcoma is rarer than 1 in 350. Physicians from Boston, MA, responded less favorably toward morcellation than providers in Pittsburgh, PA, and Chapel Hill, NC (p < 0.001). Trainees were not significantly different from attending gynecologists. One hundred and forty-seven internal medicine physicians responded for a response rate of 40%. Compared to internal medicine providers, significantly more gynecologists believe minimally invasive approaches, as opposed to laparotomy, yield the best overall outcome (p < 0.001), and the benefits of morcellation outweigh its potential risks (p < 0.001). Compared to gynecologists, more internal medicine physicians felt morcellation should be banned (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Most gynecologists highly value morcellation as a means of tissue extraction to facilitate minimally invasive approaches in order to provide the most optimal patient outcomes. Gynecologists' opinions regarding morcellation differ by geographical location but not by level of training. Gynecologists responded more favorably toward minimally invasive hysterectomy and morcellation, compared to internal medicine physicians.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages12-16
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Gynecologic Surgery
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

Fingerprint

Internal Medicine
Physicians
Hysterectomy
A 17
Morcellation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Geographic Locations
Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures
Leiomyosarcoma
Laparotomy
Cross-Sectional Studies
Incidence
Research
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • laparoscopic hysterectomy
  • leiomyosarcoma
  • minimally invasive gynecologic surgery
  • morcellation
  • opinion
  • survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Clinical application of morcellation : Provider perceptions survey (the CAMPPS Study). / Louie, Michelle; Moulder, Janelle K.; Donnellan, Nicole; Hur, Hye Chun; Siedhoff, Matthew T.

In: Journal of Gynecologic Surgery, Vol. 33, No. 1, 01.02.2017, p. 12-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Louie, Michelle ; Moulder, Janelle K. ; Donnellan, Nicole ; Hur, Hye Chun ; Siedhoff, Matthew T./ Clinical application of morcellation : Provider perceptions survey (the CAMPPS Study). In: Journal of Gynecologic Surgery. 2017 ; Vol. 33, No. 1. pp. 12-16
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