Classification of maltreatment-related mortality by Child Death Review teams: How reliable are they?

Jared W. Parrish, Patricia G. Schnitzer, Paul Lanier, Meghan E. Shanahan, Julie L. Daniels, Steven W. Marshall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Accurate estimation of the incidence of maltreatment-related child mortality depends on reliable child fatality review. We examined the inter-rater reliability of maltreatment designation for two Alaskan Child Death Review (CDR) panels. Two different multidisciplinary CDR panels each reviewed a series of 101 infant and child deaths (ages 0–4 years) in Alaska. Both panels independently reviewed identical medical, autopsy, law enforcement, child welfare, and administrative records for each death utilizing the same maltreatment criteria. Percent agreement for maltreatment was 64.7% with a weighted Kappa of 0.61 (95% CI 0.51, 0.70). Across maltreatment subtypes, agreement was highest for abuse (69.3%) and lowest for negligence (60.4%). Discordance was higher if the mother was unmarried or a smoker, if residence was rural, or if there was a family history of child protective services report(s). Incidence estimates did not depend on which panel's data were used. There is substantial room for improvement in the reliability of CDR panel assessment of maltreatment related mortality. Standardized decision guidance for CDR panels may improve the reliability of their data.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages362-370
Number of pages9
JournalChild Abuse and Neglect
Volume67
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

Fingerprint

Child Mortality
Child Guidance
Illegitimacy
Law Enforcement
Death Certificates
Malpractice
Incidence
Child Welfare
Autopsy
Mortality

Keywords

  • Child Death Review
  • Child maltreatment
  • Inter-rater reliability
  • Maltreatment classifications
  • Maltreatment definitions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Classification of maltreatment-related mortality by Child Death Review teams : How reliable are they? / Parrish, Jared W.; Schnitzer, Patricia G.; Lanier, Paul; Shanahan, Meghan E.; Daniels, Julie L.; Marshall, Steven W.

In: Child Abuse and Neglect, Vol. 67, 01.05.2017, p. 362-370.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Parrish, Jared W. ; Schnitzer, Patricia G. ; Lanier, Paul ; Shanahan, Meghan E. ; Daniels, Julie L. ; Marshall, Steven W./ Classification of maltreatment-related mortality by Child Death Review teams : How reliable are they?. In: Child Abuse and Neglect. 2017 ; Vol. 67. pp. 362-370
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