Chimeric antigen receptor T-cells for B-cell malignancies

Eben I. Lichtman, Gianpietro Dotti

Research output: Research - peer-reviewReview article

Abstract

The adoptive transfer of T-lymphocytes modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CAR-Ts) has produced impressive clinical responses among patients with B-cell malignancies. This has led to a rapid expansion in the number of clinical trials over the past several years. Although CD19-specific CAR-Ts are the most extensively evaluated, CAR-Ts specific for other B-cell–associated targets have also shown promise. However, despite this success, toxicities associated with CAR-T administration remain a significant concern. There continues to be substantial heterogeneity among CAR-T products, and differences in both CAR designs and CAR-T production strategies can substantially affect clinical outcomes. Ongoing clinical studies will further elucidate these differences and many other innovative approaches are being evaluated at the preclinical level. In this review, we will discuss the background and rationale for the use of CAR-Ts, provide an overview of advances in the field, and examine the application of CAR-Ts to the treatment of B-cell malignancies, including a summary of clinical trials published to date.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages59-82
Number of pages24
JournalTranslational Research
Volume187
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

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Antigen Receptors
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
B-Lymphocytes
Neoplasms
Cells
Clinical Trials
Adoptive Transfer
T-Lymphocytes
Therapeutics
CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor
Clinical Studies
T-cells
Toxicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Biochemistry, medical

Cite this

Chimeric antigen receptor T-cells for B-cell malignancies. / Lichtman, Eben I.; Dotti, Gianpietro.

In: Translational Research, Vol. 187, 01.09.2017, p. 59-82.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewReview article

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