Characterization of the Lung Parenchyma Using Ultrasound Multiple Scattering

Kaustav Mohanty, John Blackwell, Thomas Egan, Marie Muller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 2 Citations

Abstract

The purpose of the study described here was to showcase the application of ultrasound to quantitative characterization of the micro-architecture of the lung parenchyma to predict the extent of pulmonary edema. The lung parenchyma is a highly complex and diffusive medium for which ultrasound techniques have remained qualitative. The approach presented here is based on ultrasound multiple scattering and exploits the complexity of ultrasound propagation in the lung structure. The experimental setup consisted of a linear transducer array with an 8-MHz central frequency placed in contact with the lung surface. The diffusion constant D and transport mean free path L* of the lung parenchyma were estimated by separating the incoherent and coherent intensities in the near field and measuring the growth of the incoherent diffusive halo over time. Significant differences were observed between the L* values obtained in healthy and edematous rat lungs in vivo. In the control rat lung, L* was found to be 332 μm (±48.8 μm), whereas in the edematous lung, it was 1040 μm (±90 μm). The reproducibility of the measurements of L* and D was tested in vivo and in phantoms made of melamine sponge with varying air volume fractions. Two-dimensional finite difference time domain numerical simulations were carried out on rabbit lung histology images with varying degrees of lung collapse. Significant correlations were observed between air volume fraction and L* in simulation (r = −0.9542, p < 0.0117) and sponge phantom (r = −0.9932, p < 0.0068) experiments. Ex vivo measurements of a rat lung in which edema was simulated by adding phosphate-buffered saline revealed a linear relationship between the fluid volume fraction and L*. These results illustrate the potential of methods based on ultrasound multiple scattering for the quantitative characterization of the lung parenchyma.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages993-1003
Number of pages11
JournalUltrasound in Medicine and Biology
Volume43
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

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lungs
Lung
scattering
rats
edema
Porifera
Air
Pulmonary Atelectasis
melamine
histology
Pulmonary Edema
air
rabbits
Transducers
mean free path
Edema
Histology
halos
near fields
phosphates

Keywords

  • Edema
  • Fibrosis
  • Interstitial syndrome
  • Lung parenchyma
  • Multiple scattering
  • Quantitative ultrasound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Biophysics
  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Characterization of the Lung Parenchyma Using Ultrasound Multiple Scattering. / Mohanty, Kaustav; Blackwell, John; Egan, Thomas; Muller, Marie.

In: Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology, Vol. 43, No. 5, 01.05.2017, p. 993-1003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mohanty, Kaustav ; Blackwell, John ; Egan, Thomas ; Muller, Marie. / Characterization of the Lung Parenchyma Using Ultrasound Multiple Scattering. In: Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. 2017 ; Vol. 43, No. 5. pp. 993-1003
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