Chapter 3 Ecotone Dynamics. Invasibility of Alpine Tundra by Tree Species from the Subalpine Forest

George P. Malanson, Daniel G. Brown, David R. Butler, David M. Cairns, Daniel B. Fagre, Stephen J. Walsh

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

  • 3 Citations

Abstract

The alpine treeline ecotone in Glacier National Park (GNP) can respond to climate change. An examination of what is known about treelines in general indicates that seedling establishment is the important response to climate change, but this stage is also affected by many other variables. In GNP, the importance of protected sites generated by local geomorphic processes is closely connected to microclimate. Once seedlings are established, positive feedback is generated and tree species can advance rapidly. Feedback creates nonlinear relations in the response of vegetation to climate and so decouples the response to climate at least in rate. Then protected sites can become fully occupied during periods of rapid response driven by feedback but less available immediately thereafter even if the climate continues to ameliorate. The response that we see in GNP indicates that specific conditions in time and space - the historically contingent and the local - can outweigh generalities about ecotones.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Changing Alpine Treeline The Example of Glacier National Park, MT, USA
EditorsDavid Butler, George Malanson, Stephen Walsh, Daniel Fagre
Pages35-61
Number of pages27
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2008

Publication series

NameDevelopments in Earth Surface Processes
Volume12
ISSN (Print)0928-2025

Fingerprint

invasibility
ecotone
tundra
glacier
national park
treeline
climate
climate change
seedling establishment
microclimate
seedling
vegetation

Keywords

  • climate change
  • complexity
  • environmental sieve
  • microclimate
  • seedling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Geology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

Malanson, G. P., Brown, D. G., Butler, D. R., Cairns, D. M., Fagre, D. B., & Walsh, S. J. (2008). Chapter 3 Ecotone Dynamics. Invasibility of Alpine Tundra by Tree Species from the Subalpine Forest. In D. Butler, G. Malanson, S. Walsh, & D. Fagre (Eds.), The Changing Alpine Treeline The Example of Glacier National Park, MT, USA (pp. 35-61). (Developments in Earth Surface Processes; Vol. 12). DOI: 10.1016/S0928-2025(08)00203-4

Chapter 3 Ecotone Dynamics. Invasibility of Alpine Tundra by Tree Species from the Subalpine Forest. / Malanson, George P.; Brown, Daniel G.; Butler, David R.; Cairns, David M.; Fagre, Daniel B.; Walsh, Stephen J.

The Changing Alpine Treeline The Example of Glacier National Park, MT, USA. ed. / David Butler; George Malanson; Stephen Walsh; Daniel Fagre. 2008. p. 35-61 (Developments in Earth Surface Processes; Vol. 12).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Malanson, GP, Brown, DG, Butler, DR, Cairns, DM, Fagre, DB & Walsh, SJ 2008, Chapter 3 Ecotone Dynamics. Invasibility of Alpine Tundra by Tree Species from the Subalpine Forest. in D Butler, G Malanson, S Walsh & D Fagre (eds), The Changing Alpine Treeline The Example of Glacier National Park, MT, USA. Developments in Earth Surface Processes, vol. 12, pp. 35-61. DOI: 10.1016/S0928-2025(08)00203-4
Malanson GP, Brown DG, Butler DR, Cairns DM, Fagre DB, Walsh SJ. Chapter 3 Ecotone Dynamics. Invasibility of Alpine Tundra by Tree Species from the Subalpine Forest. In Butler D, Malanson G, Walsh S, Fagre D, editors, The Changing Alpine Treeline The Example of Glacier National Park, MT, USA. 2008. p. 35-61. (Developments in Earth Surface Processes). Available from, DOI: 10.1016/S0928-2025(08)00203-4
Malanson, George P. ; Brown, Daniel G. ; Butler, David R. ; Cairns, David M. ; Fagre, Daniel B. ; Walsh, Stephen J./ Chapter 3 Ecotone Dynamics. Invasibility of Alpine Tundra by Tree Species from the Subalpine Forest. The Changing Alpine Treeline The Example of Glacier National Park, MT, USA. editor / David Butler ; George Malanson ; Stephen Walsh ; Daniel Fagre. 2008. pp. 35-61 (Developments in Earth Surface Processes).
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