CBCT uses in clinical endodontics: the effect of CBCT on the ability to locate MB2 canals in maxillary molars

J. Parker, A. Mol, E. M. Rivera, P. Tawil

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Aim: To determine whether a CBCT volume can aid in the location of MB2 canals in maxillary molars. Methodology: This prospective clinical study involved 50 patients that needed RCT on a maxillary molar. The teeth where the MB2 was located upon access with the dental operating microscope received routine root canal treatment, and teeth where MB2 was not located had a CBCT volume made after instrumenting the located canals. At the second appointment, the clinician used the aid of the CBCT volume and troughing to attempt to locate MB2. Results: The clinicians located MB2 upon initial access in 70% (n = 35) of teeth. In the remaining 15 teeth, CBCT and troughing located MB2 53% of the time in that group (8/15 teeth). Overall, MB2 was located in 86% of the 50 first and second maxillary molars (maxillary first molars 90% and maxillary second molars 73%). A total of 15 CBCT volumes were made, and of these teeth, 33% of MB2 canals (5/15 teeth) were visualized on the CBCT volume. Conclusions: This prospective clinical study showed that the effectiveness of using CBCT to locate additional MB2 canals in maxillary molars appears limited. The use of the dental operating microscope in conjunction with selective troughing and CBCT imaging allowed clinicians to locate 90% (maxillary first molars) and 73% (maxillary second molars) of MB2 canals.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages1109-1115
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Endodontic Journal
Volume50
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

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Endodontics
Tooth
Prospective Studies
Dental Pulp Cavity
Appointments and Schedules

Keywords

  • CBCT
  • maxillary molar anatomy
  • MB2
  • root canal treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

CBCT uses in clinical endodontics : the effect of CBCT on the ability to locate MB2 canals in maxillary molars. / Parker, J.; Mol, A.; Rivera, E. M.; Tawil, P.

In: International Endodontic Journal, Vol. 50, No. 12, 01.12.2017, p. 1109-1115.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Aim: To determine whether a CBCT volume can aid in the location of MB2 canals in maxillary molars. Methodology: This prospective clinical study involved 50 patients that needed RCT on a maxillary molar. The teeth where the MB2 was located upon access with the dental operating microscope received routine root canal treatment, and teeth where MB2 was not located had a CBCT volume made after instrumenting the located canals. At the second appointment, the clinician used the aid of the CBCT volume and troughing to attempt to locate MB2. Results: The clinicians located MB2 upon initial access in 70\{%} (n = 35) of teeth. In the remaining 15 teeth, CBCT and troughing located MB2 53\{%} of the time in that group (8/15 teeth). Overall, MB2 was located in 86\{%} of the 50 first and second maxillary molars (maxillary first molars 90\{%} and maxillary second molars 73\{%}). A total of 15 CBCT volumes were made, and of these teeth, 33\{%} of MB2 canals (5/15 teeth) were visualized on the CBCT volume. Conclusions: This prospective clinical study showed that the effectiveness of using CBCT to locate additional MB2 canals in maxillary molars appears limited. The use of the dental operating microscope in conjunction with selective troughing and CBCT imaging allowed clinicians to locate 90\{%} (maxillary first molars) and 73\{%} (maxillary second molars) of MB2 canals.",
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AB - Aim: To determine whether a CBCT volume can aid in the location of MB2 canals in maxillary molars. Methodology: This prospective clinical study involved 50 patients that needed RCT on a maxillary molar. The teeth where the MB2 was located upon access with the dental operating microscope received routine root canal treatment, and teeth where MB2 was not located had a CBCT volume made after instrumenting the located canals. At the second appointment, the clinician used the aid of the CBCT volume and troughing to attempt to locate MB2. Results: The clinicians located MB2 upon initial access in 70% (n = 35) of teeth. In the remaining 15 teeth, CBCT and troughing located MB2 53% of the time in that group (8/15 teeth). Overall, MB2 was located in 86% of the 50 first and second maxillary molars (maxillary first molars 90% and maxillary second molars 73%). A total of 15 CBCT volumes were made, and of these teeth, 33% of MB2 canals (5/15 teeth) were visualized on the CBCT volume. Conclusions: This prospective clinical study showed that the effectiveness of using CBCT to locate additional MB2 canals in maxillary molars appears limited. The use of the dental operating microscope in conjunction with selective troughing and CBCT imaging allowed clinicians to locate 90% (maxillary first molars) and 73% (maxillary second molars) of MB2 canals.

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