Brief Report: Factors Associated with the Selection of Initial Antiretroviral Therapy from 2009 to 2012

CFAR Network of Integrated Clinical Systems (CNICS), Michael S. Saag, Andrew O. Westfall, Stephen R. Cole, William C. Mathews, Daniel R. Drozd, Kenneth H. Mayer, Greer A. Burkholder, Mari Kitahata, Eric M. Maiese

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

We examined factors associated with selection of initial antiretroviral regimen in the CNICS cohort. Patients initiating antiretroviral therapy between July 2009 and December 2012 were classified as receiving a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-, boosted protease inhibitor (PI)-, or raltegravir-based regimen. Among 873 patients initiating antiretroviral therapy, 488 regimens contained an NNRTI, 319 a boosted PI, and 66 raltegravir. Patients with depression and women were less likely to receive an NNRTI, whereas those with underlying cardiovascular disease, liver disease, and those coinfected with hepatitis C were more likely to receive raltegravir. Those with baseline viral load >100,000 c/ml and those with substance use were more likely to receive a boosted PI. Thus, in the "real world," ARV regimen choices appear to take into account adverse effects and patient baseline characteristics. Factors that impact initial regimen selection will likely become more heterogeneous over time as more choices for HIV therapy become available.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages60-64
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Volume74
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors
Protease Inhibitors
Therapeutics
Hepatitis C
Viral Load
Liver Diseases
Cardiovascular Diseases
HIV
Raltegravir Potassium

Keywords

  • antiretroviral therapy
  • clinical practice
  • selection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Brief Report : Factors Associated with the Selection of Initial Antiretroviral Therapy from 2009 to 2012. / CFAR Network of Integrated Clinical Systems (CNICS).

In: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, Vol. 74, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 60-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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