Bidirectional influence between African American mothers' and children's racial centrality from elementary through high school

Adam J. Hoffman, Beth Kurtz-Costes, Stephanie J. Rowley, Elizabeth A. Adams

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

For many African Americans, racial identity is an important aspect of their individual identity. We explored developmental change and stability of individual differences in the racial centrality of African American youths and their mothers as well as the relation between maternal and child racial centrality across time. African American youths (N = 380) and mothers completed surveys when youths were in grades 5, 7, 10, and 12. Mean levels of youths' racial centrality did not increase or decrease across the 7 years of the study. The stability of individual differences in youths' racial centrality increased across time, reaching adult levels by high school. Cross-lagged panel analyses showed relations between mothers' and children's racial centrality in middle adolescence but not in early and late adolescence. Results document that the importance of race to the personal identities of African American youths does not show normative developmental change across adolescence, and only minimal change is linked to maternal influence.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages1130-1141
Number of pages12
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume53
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

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African Americans
Mothers
school
adolescence
Individuality
American
Mother-Child Relations
school grade
time

Keywords

  • African American
  • Development
  • Racial centrality
  • Racial identity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

Bidirectional influence between African American mothers' and children's racial centrality from elementary through high school. / Hoffman, Adam J.; Kurtz-Costes, Beth; Rowley, Stephanie J.; Adams, Elizabeth A.

In: Developmental Psychology, Vol. 53, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. 1130-1141.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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