Believability of new diseases reported in the 2014 Surgeon General's Report on smoking: Experimental results from a national survey of US adults

Diane B. Francis, Seth M. Noar, Sarah D. Kowitt, Kristen L. Jarman, Adam O. Goldstein

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

  • 1 Citations

Abstract

Background Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease and death globally. The 2014 Surgeon General's Report included new diseases linked to smoking, including liver and colon cancer, diabetes and tuberculosis. As more diseases are linked to smoking, which diseases should we communicate to the public and what message source has the most impact? Methods Data were collected through a nationally representative phone survey of US adults (N = 5014), conducted from September 2014 through May 2015. We experimentally randomized participants to a 2 (new smoking disease messages - liver and colon cancers compared to diabetes and tuberculosis) by 4 (message sources - CDC, FDA, Surgeon General, and none) experiment. The outcome was message believability. Results About half the sample was female (51.5%) and 17.8% were a current smoker. Overall, 56% of participants said the messages were very believable. Cancer messages (liver and colon cancer) were significantly more believable than messages about chronic disease (tuberculosis and diabetes), 61% vs. 52%. Smokers were less likely to report both sets of new disease messages as very believable compared to non-smokers. Significantly more smokers intending to quit (44.5%) found the messages to be very believable compared to smokers not intending to quit (22.6%). Believability did not differ by message source. Conclusion Important differences exist in believability of disease messages about new tobacco-related information. Messages emphasizing the causal link between smoking and new diseases should be considered for use in mass media campaigns.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages94-98
Number of pages5
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume99
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Smoking
Surveys and Questionnaires
Surgeons
Liver Neoplasms
Colonic Neoplasms
Tuberculosis
Mass Media
Tobacco Use
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Tobacco
Chronic Disease

Keywords

  • Campaigns
  • Health communication
  • Message
  • Smoking
  • Source

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Believability of new diseases reported in the 2014 Surgeon General's Report on smoking : Experimental results from a national survey of US adults. / Francis, Diane B.; Noar, Seth M.; Kowitt, Sarah D.; Jarman, Kristen L.; Goldstein, Adam O.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 99, 01.06.2017, p. 94-98.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

@article{4da019ae02bf4812990eeaf92109bfa4,
title = "Believability of new diseases reported in the 2014 Surgeon General's Report on smoking: Experimental results from a national survey of US adults",
abstract = "Background Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease and death globally. The 2014 Surgeon General's Report included new diseases linked to smoking, including liver and colon cancer, diabetes and tuberculosis. As more diseases are linked to smoking, which diseases should we communicate to the public and what message source has the most impact? Methods Data were collected through a nationally representative phone survey of US adults (N = 5014), conducted from September 2014 through May 2015. We experimentally randomized participants to a 2 (new smoking disease messages - liver and colon cancers compared to diabetes and tuberculosis) by 4 (message sources - CDC, FDA, Surgeon General, and none) experiment. The outcome was message believability. Results About half the sample was female (51.5%) and 17.8% were a current smoker. Overall, 56% of participants said the messages were very believable. Cancer messages (liver and colon cancer) were significantly more believable than messages about chronic disease (tuberculosis and diabetes), 61% vs. 52%. Smokers were less likely to report both sets of new disease messages as very believable compared to non-smokers. Significantly more smokers intending to quit (44.5%) found the messages to be very believable compared to smokers not intending to quit (22.6%). Believability did not differ by message source. Conclusion Important differences exist in believability of disease messages about new tobacco-related information. Messages emphasizing the causal link between smoking and new diseases should be considered for use in mass media campaigns.",
keywords = "Campaigns, Health communication, Message, Smoking, Source",
author = "Francis, {Diane B.} and Noar, {Seth M.} and Kowitt, {Sarah D.} and Jarman, {Kristen L.} and Goldstein, {Adam O.}",
year = "2017",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.01.021",
volume = "99",
pages = "94--98",
journal = "Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0091-7435",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Believability of new diseases reported in the 2014 Surgeon General's Report on smoking

T2 - Preventive Medicine

AU - Francis,Diane B.

AU - Noar,Seth M.

AU - Kowitt,Sarah D.

AU - Jarman,Kristen L.

AU - Goldstein,Adam O.

PY - 2017/6/1

Y1 - 2017/6/1

N2 - Background Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease and death globally. The 2014 Surgeon General's Report included new diseases linked to smoking, including liver and colon cancer, diabetes and tuberculosis. As more diseases are linked to smoking, which diseases should we communicate to the public and what message source has the most impact? Methods Data were collected through a nationally representative phone survey of US adults (N = 5014), conducted from September 2014 through May 2015. We experimentally randomized participants to a 2 (new smoking disease messages - liver and colon cancers compared to diabetes and tuberculosis) by 4 (message sources - CDC, FDA, Surgeon General, and none) experiment. The outcome was message believability. Results About half the sample was female (51.5%) and 17.8% were a current smoker. Overall, 56% of participants said the messages were very believable. Cancer messages (liver and colon cancer) were significantly more believable than messages about chronic disease (tuberculosis and diabetes), 61% vs. 52%. Smokers were less likely to report both sets of new disease messages as very believable compared to non-smokers. Significantly more smokers intending to quit (44.5%) found the messages to be very believable compared to smokers not intending to quit (22.6%). Believability did not differ by message source. Conclusion Important differences exist in believability of disease messages about new tobacco-related information. Messages emphasizing the causal link between smoking and new diseases should be considered for use in mass media campaigns.

AB - Background Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease and death globally. The 2014 Surgeon General's Report included new diseases linked to smoking, including liver and colon cancer, diabetes and tuberculosis. As more diseases are linked to smoking, which diseases should we communicate to the public and what message source has the most impact? Methods Data were collected through a nationally representative phone survey of US adults (N = 5014), conducted from September 2014 through May 2015. We experimentally randomized participants to a 2 (new smoking disease messages - liver and colon cancers compared to diabetes and tuberculosis) by 4 (message sources - CDC, FDA, Surgeon General, and none) experiment. The outcome was message believability. Results About half the sample was female (51.5%) and 17.8% were a current smoker. Overall, 56% of participants said the messages were very believable. Cancer messages (liver and colon cancer) were significantly more believable than messages about chronic disease (tuberculosis and diabetes), 61% vs. 52%. Smokers were less likely to report both sets of new disease messages as very believable compared to non-smokers. Significantly more smokers intending to quit (44.5%) found the messages to be very believable compared to smokers not intending to quit (22.6%). Believability did not differ by message source. Conclusion Important differences exist in believability of disease messages about new tobacco-related information. Messages emphasizing the causal link between smoking and new diseases should be considered for use in mass media campaigns.

KW - Campaigns

KW - Health communication

KW - Message

KW - Smoking

KW - Source

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85013468614&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85013468614&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.01.021

DO - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.01.021

M3 - Article

VL - 99

SP - 94

EP - 98

JO - Preventive Medicine

JF - Preventive Medicine

SN - 0091-7435

ER -