Attachment to Conventional Institutions and Adolescent Rapid Repeat Pregnancy: A Longitudinal National Study Among Adolescents in the United States

Bianka M. Reese, Carolyn T. Halpern

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

Introduction There is limited research on rapid repeat pregnancies (RRP) among adolescents, especially using nationally representative samples. We examine distal factors—school, family, peers, and public/private religious ties—and their associations with RRP among adolescent mothers. Methods Guided by social development theory, we conducted multivariate logistic regression analyses, adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, to examine associations between RRP and attachment to school, family, peers, and religion among 1158 female respondents from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) who reported at least one live birth before age 20. Results Attachments to conventional institutions were associated with lower likelihood of RRP. Adolescent mothers who had a stronger relationship with their parents had reduced odds of RRP (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.83, 95 % CI 0.71–0.99). Increased odds of RRP were associated with anticipating fewer negative social consequences of sex (aOR 1.18, 95 % CI 1.02–1.35), never praying (versus praying daily; aOR 1.47, 95 % CI 1.10–1.96), and never participating in church-related youth activities (versus participating once a week; 1.04, 95 % CI 1.01–1.07). Discussion After an adolescent birth, social support from family, peers, and the community can benefit young mothers. Private aspects of religiosity may be especially important. Understanding the processes by which these distal factors are linked to the likelihood of RRP is needed to create multifaceted intervention programs that provide diverse methods of support customized to specific circumstances of adolescent mothers.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages58-67
Number of pages10
JournalMaternal and Child Health Journal
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

Fingerprint

Longitudinal Studies
Pregnancy
Mothers
Odds Ratio
Pregnancy in Adolescence
Live Birth
Religion
Social Support
Parents
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Parturition
Health
Research
Social Theory
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • Family
  • Peers
  • Religion
  • Repeat pregnancy
  • School

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Epidemiology
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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title = "Attachment to Conventional Institutions and Adolescent Rapid Repeat Pregnancy: A Longitudinal National Study Among Adolescents in the United States",
abstract = "Introduction There is limited research on rapid repeat pregnancies (RRP) among adolescents, especially using nationally representative samples. We examine distal factors—school, family, peers, and public/private religious ties—and their associations with RRP among adolescent mothers. Methods Guided by social development theory, we conducted multivariate logistic regression analyses, adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, to examine associations between RRP and attachment to school, family, peers, and religion among 1158 female respondents from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) who reported at least one live birth before age 20. Results Attachments to conventional institutions were associated with lower likelihood of RRP. Adolescent mothers who had a stronger relationship with their parents had reduced odds of RRP (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.83, 95 % CI 0.71–0.99). Increased odds of RRP were associated with anticipating fewer negative social consequences of sex (aOR 1.18, 95 % CI 1.02–1.35), never praying (versus praying daily; aOR 1.47, 95 % CI 1.10–1.96), and never participating in church-related youth activities (versus participating once a week; 1.04, 95 % CI 1.01–1.07). Discussion After an adolescent birth, social support from family, peers, and the community can benefit young mothers. Private aspects of religiosity may be especially important. Understanding the processes by which these distal factors are linked to the likelihood of RRP is needed to create multifaceted intervention programs that provide diverse methods of support customized to specific circumstances of adolescent mothers.",
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