Associations of Coping Strategies with Diary Based Pain Variables Among Caucasian and African American Patients with Osteoarthritis

Yvonne M. Golightly, Kelli D. Allen, Karen M. Stechuchak, Cynthia J. Coffman, Francis J. Keefe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 5 Citations

Abstract

Purpose: The purposes of this study are to examine the associations between pain coping strategies and daily diary-based pain measures and to determine whether these associations differed by race (African American and Caucasian). Methods: Primary care patients from the Durham Veterans Affairs and Duke University Medical Centers (N = 153) with hand, hip, or knee osteoarthritis (OA) completed electronic pain diaries on a one-weekend day and one weekday. The maximum, range (maximum minus minimum pain), and area under the curve (AUC) of joint pain ratings were calculated. Pain coping (Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ) coping attempts, catastrophizing, and praying/hoping subscale scores) was assessed prior to diary entries and at the end of each diary day (total, problem-focused, and emotion-focused scores from Stone and Neale's Daily Coping Inventory). Pearson correlations between pain variables and coping measures were examined. Linear mixed models were fit including age, race, weekend/weekday, study enrollment site, education level, pain medication use, self-rated health, Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales affect and function subscales, and interactions of coping measures with race and weekend day/weekday status. Results: Correlations between coping and pain measures were 0.12–0.45. In adjusted models, maximum pain and pain range were associated with all three diary-based coping measures; maximum pain was associated with CSQ coping attempts; and AUC was associated with CSQ praying/hoping. Interactions were not significant. Conclusions: Among participants with OA, pain coping strategies were related to important aspects of the pain experience, particularly pain range and maximum pain. However, race did not modify associations of pain coping strategy use and the pain experience.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages101-108
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

Fingerprint

Osteoarthritis
African Americans
Pain
Area Under Curve
Catastrophization
Hip Osteoarthritis
Knee Osteoarthritis
Arthralgia
Veterans
Arthritis
Linear Models
Primary Health Care
Emotions

Keywords

  • Coping
  • Coping skills
  • Ethnic group
  • Handheld computer
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Associations of Coping Strategies with Diary Based Pain Variables Among Caucasian and African American Patients with Osteoarthritis. / Golightly, Yvonne M.; Allen, Kelli D.; Stechuchak, Karen M.; Coffman, Cynthia J.; Keefe, Francis J.

In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 22, No. 1, 01.02.2015, p. 101-108.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{199fdf0eedf9418ca8e0d067683f2011,
title = "Associations of Coping Strategies with Diary Based Pain Variables Among Caucasian and African American Patients with Osteoarthritis",
abstract = "Purpose: The purposes of this study are to examine the associations between pain coping strategies and daily diary-based pain measures and to determine whether these associations differed by race (African American and Caucasian). Methods: Primary care patients from the Durham Veterans Affairs and Duke University Medical Centers (N = 153) with hand, hip, or knee osteoarthritis (OA) completed electronic pain diaries on a one-weekend day and one weekday. The maximum, range (maximum minus minimum pain), and area under the curve (AUC) of joint pain ratings were calculated. Pain coping (Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ) coping attempts, catastrophizing, and praying/hoping subscale scores) was assessed prior to diary entries and at the end of each diary day (total, problem-focused, and emotion-focused scores from Stone and Neale's Daily Coping Inventory). Pearson correlations between pain variables and coping measures were examined. Linear mixed models were fit including age, race, weekend/weekday, study enrollment site, education level, pain medication use, self-rated health, Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales affect and function subscales, and interactions of coping measures with race and weekend day/weekday status. Results: Correlations between coping and pain measures were 0.12–0.45. In adjusted models, maximum pain and pain range were associated with all three diary-based coping measures; maximum pain was associated with CSQ coping attempts; and AUC was associated with CSQ praying/hoping. Interactions were not significant. Conclusions: Among participants with OA, pain coping strategies were related to important aspects of the pain experience, particularly pain range and maximum pain. However, race did not modify associations of pain coping strategy use and the pain experience.",
keywords = "Coping, Coping skills, Ethnic group, Handheld computer, Osteoarthritis, Pain",
author = "Golightly, {Yvonne M.} and Allen, {Kelli D.} and Stechuchak, {Karen M.} and Coffman, {Cynthia J.} and Keefe, {Francis J.}",
year = "2015",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s12529-013-9365-3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "22",
pages = "101--108",
journal = "International Journal of Behavioral Medicine",
issn = "1070-5503",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations of Coping Strategies with Diary Based Pain Variables Among Caucasian and African American Patients with Osteoarthritis

AU - Golightly, Yvonne M.

AU - Allen, Kelli D.

AU - Stechuchak, Karen M.

AU - Coffman, Cynthia J.

AU - Keefe, Francis J.

PY - 2015/2/1

Y1 - 2015/2/1

N2 - Purpose: The purposes of this study are to examine the associations between pain coping strategies and daily diary-based pain measures and to determine whether these associations differed by race (African American and Caucasian). Methods: Primary care patients from the Durham Veterans Affairs and Duke University Medical Centers (N = 153) with hand, hip, or knee osteoarthritis (OA) completed electronic pain diaries on a one-weekend day and one weekday. The maximum, range (maximum minus minimum pain), and area under the curve (AUC) of joint pain ratings were calculated. Pain coping (Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ) coping attempts, catastrophizing, and praying/hoping subscale scores) was assessed prior to diary entries and at the end of each diary day (total, problem-focused, and emotion-focused scores from Stone and Neale's Daily Coping Inventory). Pearson correlations between pain variables and coping measures were examined. Linear mixed models were fit including age, race, weekend/weekday, study enrollment site, education level, pain medication use, self-rated health, Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales affect and function subscales, and interactions of coping measures with race and weekend day/weekday status. Results: Correlations between coping and pain measures were 0.12–0.45. In adjusted models, maximum pain and pain range were associated with all three diary-based coping measures; maximum pain was associated with CSQ coping attempts; and AUC was associated with CSQ praying/hoping. Interactions were not significant. Conclusions: Among participants with OA, pain coping strategies were related to important aspects of the pain experience, particularly pain range and maximum pain. However, race did not modify associations of pain coping strategy use and the pain experience.

AB - Purpose: The purposes of this study are to examine the associations between pain coping strategies and daily diary-based pain measures and to determine whether these associations differed by race (African American and Caucasian). Methods: Primary care patients from the Durham Veterans Affairs and Duke University Medical Centers (N = 153) with hand, hip, or knee osteoarthritis (OA) completed electronic pain diaries on a one-weekend day and one weekday. The maximum, range (maximum minus minimum pain), and area under the curve (AUC) of joint pain ratings were calculated. Pain coping (Coping Strategies Questionnaire (CSQ) coping attempts, catastrophizing, and praying/hoping subscale scores) was assessed prior to diary entries and at the end of each diary day (total, problem-focused, and emotion-focused scores from Stone and Neale's Daily Coping Inventory). Pearson correlations between pain variables and coping measures were examined. Linear mixed models were fit including age, race, weekend/weekday, study enrollment site, education level, pain medication use, self-rated health, Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales affect and function subscales, and interactions of coping measures with race and weekend day/weekday status. Results: Correlations between coping and pain measures were 0.12–0.45. In adjusted models, maximum pain and pain range were associated with all three diary-based coping measures; maximum pain was associated with CSQ coping attempts; and AUC was associated with CSQ praying/hoping. Interactions were not significant. Conclusions: Among participants with OA, pain coping strategies were related to important aspects of the pain experience, particularly pain range and maximum pain. However, race did not modify associations of pain coping strategy use and the pain experience.

KW - Coping

KW - Coping skills

KW - Ethnic group

KW - Handheld computer

KW - Osteoarthritis

KW - Pain

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84894551621&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84894551621&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s12529-013-9365-3

DO - 10.1007/s12529-013-9365-3

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 101

EP - 108

JO - International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

T2 - International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

JF - International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

SN - 1070-5503

IS - 1

ER -