Are CDI Systems Multicolored, Facultative, Helping Greenbeards?

Elizabeth S. Danka, Erin C. Garcia, Peggy A. Cotter

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

  • 7 Citations

Abstract

Competitive and cooperative interactions between organisms, including bacteria, can significantly impact the composition of a community and the fitness of its members, as well as the fitness of their hosts when communities are living on or within other organisms. Understanding the underlying mechanisms is critical to the development of strategies to control microbiological communities that impact animal and plant health and also for understanding the evolution of social behaviors, which has been challenging for evolutionary biologists. Contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) is a phenomenon defined by the delivery of a protein toxin to the cytoplasm of neighboring bacteria upon cell–cell contact, resulting in growth inhibition or death unless a specific immunity protein is present. CDI was first described based on observations of interbacterial killing and has been assumed to function primarily as a means of eliminating competitor cells. However, recent molecular evidence indicates that multiple levels of specificity restrict CDI toxin delivery and activity to the same bacterial strain, and that CDI system proteins can mediate cooperative behaviors among ‘self’ cells, a phenomenon called contact-dependent signaling (CDS). Here we review these recent findings and discuss potential biological and evolutionary implications of CDI system-mediated interbacterial competition and cooperation.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages391-401
Number of pages11
JournalTrends in Microbiology
Volume25
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

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Growth
Bacteria
Proteins
Social Behavior
Cooperative Behavior
Inhibition (Psychology)
Immunity
Cytoplasm
Health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Virology

Cite this

Are CDI Systems Multicolored, Facultative, Helping Greenbeards? / Danka, Elizabeth S.; Garcia, Erin C.; Cotter, Peggy A.

In: Trends in Microbiology, Vol. 25, No. 5, 01.05.2017, p. 391-401.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Danka, Elizabeth S. ; Garcia, Erin C. ; Cotter, Peggy A. / Are CDI Systems Multicolored, Facultative, Helping Greenbeards?. In: Trends in Microbiology. 2017 ; Vol. 25, No. 5. pp. 391-401.
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