Apheresis for collection of Ebola convalescent plasma in Liberia

Jerry F. Brown, Kathleen Rowe, Peter Zacharias, James van Hasselt, John M. Dye, David A. Wohl, William A. Fischer, Coleen K. Cunningham, Nathan M. Thielman, David L. Hoover

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

Purpose: This report describes initiation of apheresis capability in Liberia, Africa to support a clinical trial of convalescent plasma therapy for Ebola Virus Disease. Methods: A bloodmobile was outfitted in the United States as a four-bed apheresis unit with capabilities including pathogen reduction, electronic blood establishment computer system, designated areas for donor counseling and laboratory testing, and onboard electrical power generation. After air transport to Liberia, the bloodmobile was positioned at ELWA Hospital, Monrovia, and connected to the hospital's power grid. Liberian staff were trained to conduct donor screening, which included questionnaire and onsite blood typing and transfusion transmitted infection (TTI) testing, and plasma collection and processing. Results: The bloodmobile was operational within 3 weeks after arrival of the advance team. Of 101 donors who passed the pre-screening questionnaire, 32 were deferred. Twenty-eight of ninty-nine tested survivors were deferred for positive transfusion transmitted infection (TTI) tests; twenty-one were positive for hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or human immunodeficiency virus. The majority of donors had type O blood; all but one were Rh positive. Forty-three survivors donated at least once; eighty-nine apheresis attempts resulted in eighty-one successful collections. Conclusions: Apheresis capability was emergently established in Liberia to support an efficacy trial of Ebola Convalescent Plasma. Extensive cooperation among multinational team members, engineers, logisticians, and blood safety technical personnel at the operational site was required to surmount challenges to execution posed by logistical factors. The high proportion of positive TTI tests supported the use of a pathogen reduction system to enhance product safety. J. Clin. Apheresis 32:175–181, 2017.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages175-181
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Apheresis
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

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Liberia
Blood Component Removal
Infection
Surveys and Questionnaires
Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever
Blood Grouping and Crossmatching
Blood Safety
Donor Selection
Computer Systems
Hepatitis C
Hepatitis B
Blood Transfusion
Counseling
Air
Clinical Trials
HIV
Safety
Therapeutics
Power (Psychology)

Keywords

  • blood groups
  • bloodmobile
  • pathogen reduction
  • survivor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Brown, J. F., Rowe, K., Zacharias, P., van Hasselt, J., Dye, J. M., Wohl, D. A., ... Hoover, D. L. (2017). Apheresis for collection of Ebola convalescent plasma in Liberia. Journal of Clinical Apheresis, 32(3), 175-181. DOI: 10.1002/jca.21482

Apheresis for collection of Ebola convalescent plasma in Liberia. / Brown, Jerry F.; Rowe, Kathleen; Zacharias, Peter; van Hasselt, James; Dye, John M.; Wohl, David A.; Fischer, William A.; Cunningham, Coleen K.; Thielman, Nathan M.; Hoover, David L.

In: Journal of Clinical Apheresis, Vol. 32, No. 3, 01.06.2017, p. 175-181.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Brown, JF, Rowe, K, Zacharias, P, van Hasselt, J, Dye, JM, Wohl, DA, Fischer, WA, Cunningham, CK, Thielman, NM & Hoover, DL 2017, 'Apheresis for collection of Ebola convalescent plasma in Liberia' Journal of Clinical Apheresis, vol 32, no. 3, pp. 175-181. DOI: 10.1002/jca.21482
Brown JF, Rowe K, Zacharias P, van Hasselt J, Dye JM, Wohl DA et al. Apheresis for collection of Ebola convalescent plasma in Liberia. Journal of Clinical Apheresis. 2017 Jun 1;32(3):175-181. Available from, DOI: 10.1002/jca.21482
Brown, Jerry F. ; Rowe, Kathleen ; Zacharias, Peter ; van Hasselt, James ; Dye, John M. ; Wohl, David A. ; Fischer, William A. ; Cunningham, Coleen K. ; Thielman, Nathan M. ; Hoover, David L./ Apheresis for collection of Ebola convalescent plasma in Liberia. In: Journal of Clinical Apheresis. 2017 ; Vol. 32, No. 3. pp. 175-181
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