Annual incidence rates of hip symptoms and three hip OA outcomes from a U.S. population-based cohort study: the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project

A. S. Moss, L. B. Murphy, C. G. Helmick, T. A. Schwartz, K. E. Barbour, J. B. Renner, W. Kalsbeek, J. M. Jordan

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Abstract

Objective Estimate annual incidence rates (IRs) of hip symptoms and three osteoarthritis (OA) outcomes (radiographic, symptomatic, and severe radiographic) overall and by race, sociodemographic characteristics, and hip OA risk factors. Design Analyze baseline (1991–1997) and first follow-up (1999–2003) data (n = 1446) from the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project, a population-based, prospective study of adults ≥45 years in North Carolina. Hip symptoms were pain, aching, and/or stiffness on most days, or groin pain. Radiographic and severe radiographic OA were Kellgren–Lawrence (KL) grades ≥2 and ≥3, respectively. Symptomatic OA was radiographic OA with symptoms in the same hip. Sociodemographics were age, gender, race, highest attained education, and annual household income. Hip OA risk factors were self-reported body mass index (BMI) at age 18 years, clinically measured BMI at baseline, and history of hip injury. Results Annual IRs (median = 5.5 years follow-up) were 37, 23, 13, and 2.9 per 1000 person-years for hip symptoms, and radiographic, symptomatic, and severe radiographic hip OA, respectively. We found low IRs of radiographic and symptomatic hip OA among African Americans and high IRs of hip symptoms among the obese and the very poor. Across outcomes, IRs were highest for those with hip injury. Conclusion No prior studies have reported IRs of hip symptoms; IRs of radiographic and severe radiographic hip OA were similar to, and the IR of symptomatic hip OA was higher than, previous estimates. Prevention efforts should target low socioeconomic status (SES) populations and obese adults; interventions for hip OA and hip symptoms are imperative for those with hip injuries.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages1518-1527
Number of pages10
JournalOsteoarthritis and Cartilage
Volume24
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

Fingerprint

Hip Osteoarthritis
Osteoarthritis
Hip
Cohort Studies
Jetties
Hip Injuries
Incidence
Population
Education
Stiffness
Body Mass Index
Pain
Groin
Social Class
African Americans
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • Hip osteoarthritis
  • Hip symptoms
  • Incidence rates
  • Race
  • Socioeconomic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

@article{ae56f48dcf284895b981d5e92132df11,
title = "Annual incidence rates of hip symptoms and three hip OA outcomes from a U.S. population-based cohort study: the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project",
abstract = "Objective Estimate annual incidence rates (IRs) of hip symptoms and three osteoarthritis (OA) outcomes (radiographic, symptomatic, and severe radiographic) overall and by race, sociodemographic characteristics, and hip OA risk factors. Design Analyze baseline (1991–1997) and first follow-up (1999–2003) data (n = 1446) from the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project, a population-based, prospective study of adults ≥45 years in North Carolina. Hip symptoms were pain, aching, and/or stiffness on most days, or groin pain. Radiographic and severe radiographic OA were Kellgren–Lawrence (KL) grades ≥2 and ≥3, respectively. Symptomatic OA was radiographic OA with symptoms in the same hip. Sociodemographics were age, gender, race, highest attained education, and annual household income. Hip OA risk factors were self-reported body mass index (BMI) at age 18 years, clinically measured BMI at baseline, and history of hip injury. Results Annual IRs (median = 5.5 years follow-up) were 37, 23, 13, and 2.9 per 1000 person-years for hip symptoms, and radiographic, symptomatic, and severe radiographic hip OA, respectively. We found low IRs of radiographic and symptomatic hip OA among African Americans and high IRs of hip symptoms among the obese and the very poor. Across outcomes, IRs were highest for those with hip injury. Conclusion No prior studies have reported IRs of hip symptoms; IRs of radiographic and severe radiographic hip OA were similar to, and the IR of symptomatic hip OA was higher than, previous estimates. Prevention efforts should target low socioeconomic status (SES) populations and obese adults; interventions for hip OA and hip symptoms are imperative for those with hip injuries.",
keywords = "Hip osteoarthritis, Hip symptoms, Incidence rates, Race, Socioeconomic status",
author = "Moss, {A. S.} and Murphy, {L. B.} and Helmick, {C. G.} and Schwartz, {T. A.} and Barbour, {K. E.} and Renner, {J. B.} and W. Kalsbeek and Jordan, {J. M.}",
year = "2016",
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T1 - Annual incidence rates of hip symptoms and three hip OA outcomes from a U.S. population-based cohort study

T2 - Osteoarthritis and Cartilage

AU - Moss,A. S.

AU - Murphy,L. B.

AU - Helmick,C. G.

AU - Schwartz,T. A.

AU - Barbour,K. E.

AU - Renner,J. B.

AU - Kalsbeek,W.

AU - Jordan,J. M.

PY - 2016/9/1

Y1 - 2016/9/1

N2 - Objective Estimate annual incidence rates (IRs) of hip symptoms and three osteoarthritis (OA) outcomes (radiographic, symptomatic, and severe radiographic) overall and by race, sociodemographic characteristics, and hip OA risk factors. Design Analyze baseline (1991–1997) and first follow-up (1999–2003) data (n = 1446) from the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project, a population-based, prospective study of adults ≥45 years in North Carolina. Hip symptoms were pain, aching, and/or stiffness on most days, or groin pain. Radiographic and severe radiographic OA were Kellgren–Lawrence (KL) grades ≥2 and ≥3, respectively. Symptomatic OA was radiographic OA with symptoms in the same hip. Sociodemographics were age, gender, race, highest attained education, and annual household income. Hip OA risk factors were self-reported body mass index (BMI) at age 18 years, clinically measured BMI at baseline, and history of hip injury. Results Annual IRs (median = 5.5 years follow-up) were 37, 23, 13, and 2.9 per 1000 person-years for hip symptoms, and radiographic, symptomatic, and severe radiographic hip OA, respectively. We found low IRs of radiographic and symptomatic hip OA among African Americans and high IRs of hip symptoms among the obese and the very poor. Across outcomes, IRs were highest for those with hip injury. Conclusion No prior studies have reported IRs of hip symptoms; IRs of radiographic and severe radiographic hip OA were similar to, and the IR of symptomatic hip OA was higher than, previous estimates. Prevention efforts should target low socioeconomic status (SES) populations and obese adults; interventions for hip OA and hip symptoms are imperative for those with hip injuries.

AB - Objective Estimate annual incidence rates (IRs) of hip symptoms and three osteoarthritis (OA) outcomes (radiographic, symptomatic, and severe radiographic) overall and by race, sociodemographic characteristics, and hip OA risk factors. Design Analyze baseline (1991–1997) and first follow-up (1999–2003) data (n = 1446) from the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project, a population-based, prospective study of adults ≥45 years in North Carolina. Hip symptoms were pain, aching, and/or stiffness on most days, or groin pain. Radiographic and severe radiographic OA were Kellgren–Lawrence (KL) grades ≥2 and ≥3, respectively. Symptomatic OA was radiographic OA with symptoms in the same hip. Sociodemographics were age, gender, race, highest attained education, and annual household income. Hip OA risk factors were self-reported body mass index (BMI) at age 18 years, clinically measured BMI at baseline, and history of hip injury. Results Annual IRs (median = 5.5 years follow-up) were 37, 23, 13, and 2.9 per 1000 person-years for hip symptoms, and radiographic, symptomatic, and severe radiographic hip OA, respectively. We found low IRs of radiographic and symptomatic hip OA among African Americans and high IRs of hip symptoms among the obese and the very poor. Across outcomes, IRs were highest for those with hip injury. Conclusion No prior studies have reported IRs of hip symptoms; IRs of radiographic and severe radiographic hip OA were similar to, and the IR of symptomatic hip OA was higher than, previous estimates. Prevention efforts should target low socioeconomic status (SES) populations and obese adults; interventions for hip OA and hip symptoms are imperative for those with hip injuries.

KW - Hip osteoarthritis

KW - Hip symptoms

KW - Incidence rates

KW - Race

KW - Socioeconomic status

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