Annual Incidence of Knee Symptoms and Four Knee Osteoarthritis Outcomes in the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project

Louise B. Murphy, Susan Moss, Barbara T. Do, Charles G. Helmick, Todd A. Schwartz, Kamil E. Barbour, Jordan Renner, William Kalsbeek, Joanne M. Jordan

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

  • 11 Citations

Abstract

Objective To estimate annual incidence rates (IRs) of knee symptoms and 4 knee osteoarthritis (OA) outcomes (radiographic, symptomatic, severe radiographic, and severe symptomatic), overall and stratified by sociodemographic characteristics and knee OA risk factors. Methods We analyzed baseline (1991-1997) and first followup (1999-2003) data (n = 1,518) from the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project. Participants were African American and white adults, ages ≥45 years, living in Johnston County, North Carolina, US. Knee symptoms were pain, aching, or stiffness on most days in a knee. Radiographic OA was Kellgren/Lawrence grade ≤2 (severe radiographic ≥3) in at least 1 knee. Symptomatic OA was defined as symptoms in a radiographically affected knee; severe symptomatic OA was defined as severe symptoms and severe radiographic OA. Results The median followup time was 5.5 years. Average annual IRs were 6% for symptoms, 3% for radiographic OA, 2% for symptomatic OA, 2% for severe radiographic OA, and 0.8% for severe symptomatic OA. Across outcomes, IRs were highest among those with the following baseline characteristics: Age ≥75 years, obese, a history of knee injury, or an annual household income ≤$15,000. Conclusion The annual onset of knee symptoms and 4 OA outcomes in Johnston County was high. This may preview the future of knee OA in the US and underscores the urgency of clinical and public health collaborations that reduce risk factors for, and manage the impact of, these outcomes. Inexpensive, convenient, and proven strategies (e.g., physical activity, self-management education courses) complement clinical care and can reduce pain and improve quality of life for people with arthritis.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages55-65
Number of pages11
JournalArthritis Care and Research
Volume68
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

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Knee Osteoarthritis
Osteoarthritis
Knee
Incidence
Pain
Knee Injuries
Self Care
African Americans
Arthritis
Public Health
Quality of Life
Exercise
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Annual Incidence of Knee Symptoms and Four Knee Osteoarthritis Outcomes in the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project. / Murphy, Louise B.; Moss, Susan; Do, Barbara T.; Helmick, Charles G.; Schwartz, Todd A.; Barbour, Kamil E.; Renner, Jordan; Kalsbeek, William; Jordan, Joanne M.

In: Arthritis Care and Research, Vol. 68, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 55-65.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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