Age- and treatment-related associations with health behavior change among breast cancer survivors

Chelsea Anderson, Dale P. Sandler, Clarice R. Weinberg, Kevin Houck, Minal Chunduri, M. Elizabeth Hodgson, Susan A. Sabatino, Mary C. White, Juan L. Rodriguez, Hazel B. Nichols

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

Objective The aim of this study was to identify demographic and treatment-related factors associated with health-promoting behavior changes after a breast cancer diagnosis. Changes in health behaviors were also evaluated according to weight, exercise, diet and alcohol consumption patterns before breast cancer diagnosis. Materials and methods We examined self-reported behavior changes among 1415 women diagnosed with breast cancer in the NIEHS Sister Study cohort. Women reported changes in exercising, eating healthy foods, maintaining a healthy body weight, drinking alcohol, smoking, getting enough sleep, spending time with family and friends, and participating in breast cancer awareness events. Results On average, women were 3.7 years from their breast cancer diagnosis. Overall, 20–36% reported positive changes in exercise, eating healthy foods, maintaining a healthy weight, or alcohol consumption. However, 17% exercised less. With each 5-year increase in diagnosis age, women were 11–16% less likely to report positive change in each of these behaviors (OR = 0.84–0.89; p < 0.05), except alcohol consumption (OR = 0.97; CI: 0.81, 1.17). Women who underwent chemotherapy were more likely to report eating more healthy foods (OR = 1.47; 95% CI 1.16–1.86), drinking less alcohol (OR = 2.01; 95% CI: 1.01, 4.06), and sleeping enough (OR = 1.41; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.91). The majority of women (50–84%) reported no change in exercise, eating healthy foods, efforts to maintain a healthy weight, alcohol consumption, sleep patterns, or time spent with family or friends. Conclusions Many women reported no change in cancer survivorship guideline-supported behaviors after diagnosis. Positive changes were more common among younger women or those who underwent chemotherapy.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages1-7
Number of pages7
JournalBreast
Volume33
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Health Behavior
Survivors
Breast Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Alcohol Drinking
Food
Healthy Diet
Exercise
Weights and Measures
Sleep
Drug Therapy
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (U.S.)
Siblings
Cohort Studies
Survival Rate
Smoking
Body Weight
Demography
Guidelines
Diet

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Cancer survivors
  • Exercise
  • Health behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Anderson, C., Sandler, D. P., Weinberg, C. R., Houck, K., Chunduri, M., Hodgson, M. E., ... Nichols, H. B. (2017). Age- and treatment-related associations with health behavior change among breast cancer survivors. Breast, 33, 1-7. DOI: 10.1016/j.breast.2017.02.013

Age- and treatment-related associations with health behavior change among breast cancer survivors. / Anderson, Chelsea; Sandler, Dale P.; Weinberg, Clarice R.; Houck, Kevin; Chunduri, Minal; Hodgson, M. Elizabeth; Sabatino, Susan A.; White, Mary C.; Rodriguez, Juan L.; Nichols, Hazel B.

In: Breast, Vol. 33, 01.06.2017, p. 1-7.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Anderson, C, Sandler, DP, Weinberg, CR, Houck, K, Chunduri, M, Hodgson, ME, Sabatino, SA, White, MC, Rodriguez, JL & Nichols, HB 2017, 'Age- and treatment-related associations with health behavior change among breast cancer survivors' Breast, vol 33, pp. 1-7. DOI: 10.1016/j.breast.2017.02.013
Anderson C, Sandler DP, Weinberg CR, Houck K, Chunduri M, Hodgson ME et al. Age- and treatment-related associations with health behavior change among breast cancer survivors. Breast. 2017 Jun 1;33:1-7. Available from, DOI: 10.1016/j.breast.2017.02.013
Anderson, Chelsea ; Sandler, Dale P. ; Weinberg, Clarice R. ; Houck, Kevin ; Chunduri, Minal ; Hodgson, M. Elizabeth ; Sabatino, Susan A. ; White, Mary C. ; Rodriguez, Juan L. ; Nichols, Hazel B./ Age- and treatment-related associations with health behavior change among breast cancer survivors. In: Breast. 2017 ; Vol. 33. pp. 1-7
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abstract = "Objective The aim of this study was to identify demographic and treatment-related factors associated with health-promoting behavior changes after a breast cancer diagnosis. Changes in health behaviors were also evaluated according to weight, exercise, diet and alcohol consumption patterns before breast cancer diagnosis. Materials and methods We examined self-reported behavior changes among 1415 women diagnosed with breast cancer in the NIEHS Sister Study cohort. Women reported changes in exercising, eating healthy foods, maintaining a healthy body weight, drinking alcohol, smoking, getting enough sleep, spending time with family and friends, and participating in breast cancer awareness events. Results On average, women were 3.7 years from their breast cancer diagnosis. Overall, 20–36% reported positive changes in exercise, eating healthy foods, maintaining a healthy weight, or alcohol consumption. However, 17% exercised less. With each 5-year increase in diagnosis age, women were 11–16% less likely to report positive change in each of these behaviors (OR = 0.84–0.89; p < 0.05), except alcohol consumption (OR = 0.97; CI: 0.81, 1.17). Women who underwent chemotherapy were more likely to report eating more healthy foods (OR = 1.47; 95% CI 1.16–1.86), drinking less alcohol (OR = 2.01; 95% CI: 1.01, 4.06), and sleeping enough (OR = 1.41; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.91). The majority of women (50–84%) reported no change in exercise, eating healthy foods, efforts to maintain a healthy weight, alcohol consumption, sleep patterns, or time spent with family or friends. Conclusions Many women reported no change in cancer survivorship guideline-supported behaviors after diagnosis. Positive changes were more common among younger women or those who underwent chemotherapy.",
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AB - Objective The aim of this study was to identify demographic and treatment-related factors associated with health-promoting behavior changes after a breast cancer diagnosis. Changes in health behaviors were also evaluated according to weight, exercise, diet and alcohol consumption patterns before breast cancer diagnosis. Materials and methods We examined self-reported behavior changes among 1415 women diagnosed with breast cancer in the NIEHS Sister Study cohort. Women reported changes in exercising, eating healthy foods, maintaining a healthy body weight, drinking alcohol, smoking, getting enough sleep, spending time with family and friends, and participating in breast cancer awareness events. Results On average, women were 3.7 years from their breast cancer diagnosis. Overall, 20–36% reported positive changes in exercise, eating healthy foods, maintaining a healthy weight, or alcohol consumption. However, 17% exercised less. With each 5-year increase in diagnosis age, women were 11–16% less likely to report positive change in each of these behaviors (OR = 0.84–0.89; p < 0.05), except alcohol consumption (OR = 0.97; CI: 0.81, 1.17). Women who underwent chemotherapy were more likely to report eating more healthy foods (OR = 1.47; 95% CI 1.16–1.86), drinking less alcohol (OR = 2.01; 95% CI: 1.01, 4.06), and sleeping enough (OR = 1.41; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.91). The majority of women (50–84%) reported no change in exercise, eating healthy foods, efforts to maintain a healthy weight, alcohol consumption, sleep patterns, or time spent with family or friends. Conclusions Many women reported no change in cancer survivorship guideline-supported behaviors after diagnosis. Positive changes were more common among younger women or those who underwent chemotherapy.

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