Age and Gender Differences in the Associations of Self-Compassion and Emotional Well-being in A Large Adolescent Sample

Karen Bluth, Rebecca A. Campo, William S. Futch, Susan A. Gaylord

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

Adolescence is a challenging developmental period marked with declines in emotional well-being; however, self-compassion has been suggested as a protective factor. This cross-sectional survey study (N = 765, grades 7th to 12th; 53 % female; 4 % Hispanic ethnicity; 64 % White and 21 % Black) examined whether adolescents’ self-compassion differed by age and gender, and secondly, whether its associations with emotional well-being (perceived stress, life satisfaction, distress intolerance, depressive symptoms, and anxiety) also differed by age and gender. The findings indicated that older females had the lowest self-compassion levels compared to younger females or all-age males. Self-compassion was associated with all emotional well-being measures, and gender and/or age moderated the associations with anxiety and depressive symptoms. Among older adolescents, self-compassion had a greater protective effect on anxiety for boys than for girls. Additionally, older adolescents with low and average self-compassion had greater levels of depressive symptoms than those with high self-compassion. These results may inform for whom and at what age self-compassion interventions may be implemented to protect adolescents from further declines in emotional well-being.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages840-853
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

age difference
gender-specific factors
well-being
adolescent
anxiety
gender
Anxiety
Depression
Cross-Sectional Studies
adolescence
tolerance
ethnicity
Psychological Stress
Hispanic Americans
Protective Factors
hydroquinone

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Distress intolerance
  • Emotional well-being
  • Mindfulness
  • Perceived stress
  • Self-compassion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Age and Gender Differences in the Associations of Self-Compassion and Emotional Well-being in A Large Adolescent Sample. / Bluth, Karen; Campo, Rebecca A.; Futch, William S.; Gaylord, Susan A.

In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, Vol. 46, No. 4, 01.04.2017, p. 840-853.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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