Adolescent, caregiver, and friend preferences for integrating social support and communication features into an asthma self-management app

Courtney A. Roberts, Lorie L. Geryk, Adam J. Sage, Betsy L. Sleath, Deborah F. Tate, Delesha M. Carpenter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 3 Citations

Abstract

Objectives: This study examines: 1) adolescent preferences for using asthma self-management mobile applications (apps) to interact with their friends, caregivers, medical providers, and other adolescents with asthma and 2) how caregivers and friends would use mobile apps to communicate with the adolescent and serve as sources of support for asthma management. Methods: We recruited 20 adolescents aged 12–16 years with persistent asthma, their caregivers (n = 20), and friends (n = 3) from two suburban pediatric practices in North Carolina. We gave participants iPods with two preloaded asthma apps and asked them to use the apps for 1 week. Adolescents and caregivers provided app feedback during a semi-structured interview at a regularly-scheduled clinic appointment and during a telephone interview one week later. Friends completed one telephone interview. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. An inductive, theory-driven analysis was used to identify themes and preferences. Results: Adolescents preferred to use apps for instrumental support from caregivers, informational support from friends, and belonging and informational support from others with asthma. The majority of adolescents believed apps could enhance communication with their caregivers and medical providers, and the theme of self-reliance emerged in which caregivers and adolescents believed apps could enable adolescents to better self-manage their asthma. Friends preferred to use apps to provide instrumental and informational support. Conclusions: Given preferences expressed in this study, apps may help adolescents obtain social support to better self-manage their asthma. Future app-based interventions should include features enabling adolescents with asthma to communicate and interact with their caregivers, medical providers, and friends.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages948-954
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Asthma
Volume53
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 20 2016

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Self Care
Social Support
Caregivers
Asthma
Communication
Mobile Applications
Interviews
Appointments and Schedules
Pediatrics

Keywords

  • adolescents
  • Health
  • self-management
  • self-reliance
  • social support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Adolescent, caregiver, and friend preferences for integrating social support and communication features into an asthma self-management app. / Roberts, Courtney A.; Geryk, Lorie L.; Sage, Adam J.; Sleath, Betsy L.; Tate, Deborah F.; Carpenter, Delesha M.

In: Journal of Asthma, Vol. 53, No. 9, 20.10.2016, p. 948-954.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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