Adherence to gender-typical behavior and high-frequency substance use from adolescence into young adulthood

Andra L. Wilkinson, Paul J. Fleming, Carolyn Tucker Halpern, Amy H. Herring, Kathleen Mullan Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Substance use is prevalent among adolescents in the U.S., especially males. Understanding the crosssectional and longitudinal associations between gender norms and substance use is necessary to tailor substance use prevention messages and efforts appropriately. This study investigates the relationship between adherence to gender-typical behavior (AGB) and substance use from adolescence into young adulthood. Participants in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health completed self-report measures on the frequency of binge drinking, cigarette smoking and marijuana use as well as various behaviors and emotional states that captured the latent construct of AGB. Sex-stratified logistic regression models revealed cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between AGB and high frequency substance use. For example, an adolescent male who is more gender-adherent, compared to less adherent males, has 75% higher odds of high frequency binge drinking in adolescence and 22% higher odds of high frequency binge drinking in young adulthood. Sex-stratified multinomial logistic regression models also revealed cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between AGB and patterns of use. For example, a more gender-adherent adolescent male, compared to 1 who is less adherent, is 256% more likely to use all 3 substances in adolescence and 66% more likely to use all 3 in young adulthood. Cross-sectional and longitudinal results for females indicate greater gender-adherence is associated with lower odds of high frequency substance use. These findings indicate adherence to gender norms may influence substance use behaviors across the developmental trajectory, and inform strategies for prevention efforts.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages145-155
Number of pages11
JournalPsychology of Men and Masculinity
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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adulthood
adolescence
Binge Drinking
gender
Logistic Models
adolescent
logistics
Cannabis
regression
Self Report
Longitudinal Studies
Smoking
smoking
longitudinal study
Health
health

Keywords

  • Adolescent development
  • Gender norms
  • Substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

Adherence to gender-typical behavior and high-frequency substance use from adolescence into young adulthood. / Wilkinson, Andra L.; Fleming, Paul J.; Halpern, Carolyn Tucker; Herring, Amy H.; Harris, Kathleen Mullan.

In: Psychology of Men and Masculinity, Vol. 19, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 145-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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