Active smoking and risk of Luminal and Basal-like breast cancer subtypes in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study

Eboneé N. Butler, Chiu Kit Tse, Mary Elizabeth Bell, Kathleen Conway, Andrew F. Olshan, Melissa A. Troester

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

  • 6 Citations

Abstract

Purpose: Growing evidence suggests an association between active cigarette smoking and increased breast cancer risk. However, the weak magnitude of association and conflicting results have yielded uncertainty and it is unknown whether associations differ by breast cancer subtype. Methods: Using population-based case–control data from phases I and II of the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, we examined associations between self-reported measures of smoking and risk of Luminal and Basal-like breast cancers. We used logistic regression models to estimate case–control odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Results: Ever smoking (current and former) was associated with a weakly increased risk of Luminal breast cancer (OR 1.12, 95 % CI 0.92–1.36) and was not associated with risk of Basal-like breast cancer (OR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.69–1.32). Similarly, smoking duration of more than 20 years was associated with increased risk of Luminal (OR 1.51, 95 % CI 1.19–1.93), but not Basal-like breast cancer (OR 0.90, 95 % CI 0.57–1.43). When stratified by race, elevated odds ratios between smoking and Luminal breast cancer risk were found among black women across multiple exposure measures (ever smoking, duration, and dose); conversely, among white women odds ratios were attenuated or null. Conclusions: Results from our study demonstrate a positive association between smoking and Luminal breast cancer risk, particularly among black women and women with long smoking histories. Addressing breast cancer heterogeneity in studies of smoking and breast cancer risk may elucidate associations masked in prior studies.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages775-786
Number of pages12
JournalCancer Causes and Control
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

Fingerprint

Smoking
Breast Neoplasms
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Logistic Models
Uncertainty
Population

Keywords

  • Basal-like
  • Breast cancer
  • Estrogen receptor
  • Luminal
  • Race
  • Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Active smoking and risk of Luminal and Basal-like breast cancer subtypes in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study. / Butler, Eboneé N.; Tse, Chiu Kit; Bell, Mary Elizabeth; Conway, Kathleen; Olshan, Andrew F.; Troester, Melissa A.

In: Cancer Causes and Control, Vol. 27, No. 6, 01.06.2016, p. 775-786.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

@article{654b6b6a14d54a2f9938c95fa6a80e7c,
title = "Active smoking and risk of Luminal and Basal-like breast cancer subtypes in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study",
abstract = "Purpose: Growing evidence suggests an association between active cigarette smoking and increased breast cancer risk. However, the weak magnitude of association and conflicting results have yielded uncertainty and it is unknown whether associations differ by breast cancer subtype. Methods: Using population-based case–control data from phases I and II of the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, we examined associations between self-reported measures of smoking and risk of Luminal and Basal-like breast cancers. We used logistic regression models to estimate case–control odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Results: Ever smoking (current and former) was associated with a weakly increased risk of Luminal breast cancer (OR 1.12, 95 % CI 0.92–1.36) and was not associated with risk of Basal-like breast cancer (OR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.69–1.32). Similarly, smoking duration of more than 20 years was associated with increased risk of Luminal (OR 1.51, 95 % CI 1.19–1.93), but not Basal-like breast cancer (OR 0.90, 95 % CI 0.57–1.43). When stratified by race, elevated odds ratios between smoking and Luminal breast cancer risk were found among black women across multiple exposure measures (ever smoking, duration, and dose); conversely, among white women odds ratios were attenuated or null. Conclusions: Results from our study demonstrate a positive association between smoking and Luminal breast cancer risk, particularly among black women and women with long smoking histories. Addressing breast cancer heterogeneity in studies of smoking and breast cancer risk may elucidate associations masked in prior studies.",
keywords = "Basal-like, Breast cancer, Estrogen receptor, Luminal, Race, Smoking",
author = "Butler, {Eboneé N.} and Tse, {Chiu Kit} and Bell, {Mary Elizabeth} and Kathleen Conway and Olshan, {Andrew F.} and Troester, {Melissa A.}",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1007/s10552-016-0754-1",
volume = "27",
pages = "775--786",
journal = "Cancer Causes and Control",
issn = "0957-5243",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Active smoking and risk of Luminal and Basal-like breast cancer subtypes in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study

AU - Butler,Eboneé N.

AU - Tse,Chiu Kit

AU - Bell,Mary Elizabeth

AU - Conway,Kathleen

AU - Olshan,Andrew F.

AU - Troester,Melissa A.

PY - 2016/6/1

Y1 - 2016/6/1

N2 - Purpose: Growing evidence suggests an association between active cigarette smoking and increased breast cancer risk. However, the weak magnitude of association and conflicting results have yielded uncertainty and it is unknown whether associations differ by breast cancer subtype. Methods: Using population-based case–control data from phases I and II of the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, we examined associations between self-reported measures of smoking and risk of Luminal and Basal-like breast cancers. We used logistic regression models to estimate case–control odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Results: Ever smoking (current and former) was associated with a weakly increased risk of Luminal breast cancer (OR 1.12, 95 % CI 0.92–1.36) and was not associated with risk of Basal-like breast cancer (OR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.69–1.32). Similarly, smoking duration of more than 20 years was associated with increased risk of Luminal (OR 1.51, 95 % CI 1.19–1.93), but not Basal-like breast cancer (OR 0.90, 95 % CI 0.57–1.43). When stratified by race, elevated odds ratios between smoking and Luminal breast cancer risk were found among black women across multiple exposure measures (ever smoking, duration, and dose); conversely, among white women odds ratios were attenuated or null. Conclusions: Results from our study demonstrate a positive association between smoking and Luminal breast cancer risk, particularly among black women and women with long smoking histories. Addressing breast cancer heterogeneity in studies of smoking and breast cancer risk may elucidate associations masked in prior studies.

AB - Purpose: Growing evidence suggests an association between active cigarette smoking and increased breast cancer risk. However, the weak magnitude of association and conflicting results have yielded uncertainty and it is unknown whether associations differ by breast cancer subtype. Methods: Using population-based case–control data from phases I and II of the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, we examined associations between self-reported measures of smoking and risk of Luminal and Basal-like breast cancers. We used logistic regression models to estimate case–control odds ratios (OR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI). Results: Ever smoking (current and former) was associated with a weakly increased risk of Luminal breast cancer (OR 1.12, 95 % CI 0.92–1.36) and was not associated with risk of Basal-like breast cancer (OR 0.96, 95 % CI 0.69–1.32). Similarly, smoking duration of more than 20 years was associated with increased risk of Luminal (OR 1.51, 95 % CI 1.19–1.93), but not Basal-like breast cancer (OR 0.90, 95 % CI 0.57–1.43). When stratified by race, elevated odds ratios between smoking and Luminal breast cancer risk were found among black women across multiple exposure measures (ever smoking, duration, and dose); conversely, among white women odds ratios were attenuated or null. Conclusions: Results from our study demonstrate a positive association between smoking and Luminal breast cancer risk, particularly among black women and women with long smoking histories. Addressing breast cancer heterogeneity in studies of smoking and breast cancer risk may elucidate associations masked in prior studies.

KW - Basal-like

KW - Breast cancer

KW - Estrogen receptor

KW - Luminal

KW - Race

KW - Smoking

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84966330177&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84966330177&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10552-016-0754-1

DO - 10.1007/s10552-016-0754-1

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 775

EP - 786

JO - Cancer Causes and Control

T2 - Cancer Causes and Control

JF - Cancer Causes and Control

SN - 0957-5243

IS - 6

ER -