Active ghrelin and the postpartum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Postpartum depression (PPD) occurs in 10–15 % of women. The appetite hormone ghrelin, which fluctuates during pregnancy, is associated with depression in nonpregnant samples. Here, we examine the association between PPD and active ghrelin from pregnancy to postpartum. We additionally examine whether ghrelin changes from pregnancy to postpartum and differs between breastfeeding and non-breastfeeding women. Sixty women who participated in a survey examining PPD and had information in regard to ghrelin concentrations were included in the study. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale was used to assess symptoms of PPD. Raw ghrelin levels and ghrelin levels adjusted for creatinine were included as outcomes. Women screening positive for PPD at 12 weeks postpartum had higher pregnancy ghrelin concentrations. Ghrelin concentrations significantly decreased from pregnancy to 6 weeks postpartum and this change differed based on pregnancy depression status. Finally, ghrelin levels were lower in women who breastfed compared with women who were bottle-feeding. No significant findings remained once ghrelin levels were adjusted for creatinine. Although results do not suggest an association between PPD and ghrelin after adjusting for creatinine, future research should continue to explore this possibility extending further across the postpartum period with larger sample sizes.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages515-520
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Women's Mental Health
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

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Ghrelin
Postpartum Period
Postpartum Depression
Pregnancy
Creatinine
Bottle Feeding
Depression
Appetite
Breast Feeding
Sample Size
Hormones

Keywords

  • Breastfeeding
  • Depression
  • Ghrelin
  • Postpartum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Active ghrelin and the postpartum. / Baker, Jessica H.; Pedersen, Cort; Leserman, Jane; Brownley, Kimberly A.

In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, Vol. 19, No. 3, 01.06.2016, p. 515-520.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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