ACCUMULATION OF TRITIUM IN VARIOUS SPECIES OF FISH REARED IN TRITIATED WATER.

R. G. Patzer, A. A. Moghissi, D. N. McNelis

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

  • 3 Citations

Abstract

The release of tritium into aquatic ecosystems has resulted from nuclear industry operations. Because of the projected expansion of the nuclear power industry and associated fuel reprocessing plants, such releases can be expected to increase and to require further assessment of the environmental impact. In the present study trout and channel catfish eggs were hatched and the fish maintained in tritiated water for four months. In addition, two species of minnows native to the southwest United States of America were maintained in tritiated water and offspring from these fish were reared in tritiated water for five months. The results show that for these species of fish living in tritiated water the concentration factor for organic bound tritium is generally less than unity. Literature concerning the behavior of tritium in aquatic food chains after release in nuclear industry effluents is reviewed.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages403-412
Number of pages10
Journal[No source information available]
StatePublished - 1800
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tritium
Fish
Water
Nuclear industry
Nuclear fuel reprocessing
Aquatic ecosystems
Nuclear energy
Environmental impact
Effluents
Industry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Cite this

ACCUMULATION OF TRITIUM IN VARIOUS SPECIES OF FISH REARED IN TRITIATED WATER. / Patzer, R. G.; Moghissi, A. A.; McNelis, D. N.

In: [No source information available], 1800, p. 403-412.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

@article{fc2cbc1890d147a6861adbcc50de9cb3,
title = "ACCUMULATION OF TRITIUM IN VARIOUS SPECIES OF FISH REARED IN TRITIATED WATER.",
abstract = "The release of tritium into aquatic ecosystems has resulted from nuclear industry operations. Because of the projected expansion of the nuclear power industry and associated fuel reprocessing plants, such releases can be expected to increase and to require further assessment of the environmental impact. In the present study trout and channel catfish eggs were hatched and the fish maintained in tritiated water for four months. In addition, two species of minnows native to the southwest United States of America were maintained in tritiated water and offspring from these fish were reared in tritiated water for five months. The results show that for these species of fish living in tritiated water the concentration factor for organic bound tritium is generally less than unity. Literature concerning the behavior of tritium in aquatic food chains after release in nuclear industry effluents is reviewed.",
author = "Patzer, {R. G.} and Moghissi, {A. A.} and McNelis, {D. N.}",
year = "1800",
pages = "403--412",
journal = "[No source information available]",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - ACCUMULATION OF TRITIUM IN VARIOUS SPECIES OF FISH REARED IN TRITIATED WATER.

AU - Patzer,R. G.

AU - Moghissi,A. A.

AU - McNelis,D. N.

PY - 1800

Y1 - 1800

N2 - The release of tritium into aquatic ecosystems has resulted from nuclear industry operations. Because of the projected expansion of the nuclear power industry and associated fuel reprocessing plants, such releases can be expected to increase and to require further assessment of the environmental impact. In the present study trout and channel catfish eggs were hatched and the fish maintained in tritiated water for four months. In addition, two species of minnows native to the southwest United States of America were maintained in tritiated water and offspring from these fish were reared in tritiated water for five months. The results show that for these species of fish living in tritiated water the concentration factor for organic bound tritium is generally less than unity. Literature concerning the behavior of tritium in aquatic food chains after release in nuclear industry effluents is reviewed.

AB - The release of tritium into aquatic ecosystems has resulted from nuclear industry operations. Because of the projected expansion of the nuclear power industry and associated fuel reprocessing plants, such releases can be expected to increase and to require further assessment of the environmental impact. In the present study trout and channel catfish eggs were hatched and the fish maintained in tritiated water for four months. In addition, two species of minnows native to the southwest United States of America were maintained in tritiated water and offspring from these fish were reared in tritiated water for five months. The results show that for these species of fish living in tritiated water the concentration factor for organic bound tritium is generally less than unity. Literature concerning the behavior of tritium in aquatic food chains after release in nuclear industry effluents is reviewed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0016407219&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0016407219&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

SP - 403

EP - 412

JO - [No source information available]

T2 - [No source information available]

JF - [No source information available]

ER -