A shadow detector for photosynthesis efficiency

Kang Ling Liao, Roger D. Jones, Patrick McCarter, Meral Tunc-Ozdemir, James A. Draper, Timothy C. Elston, David Kramer, Alan M. Jones

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

  • 3 Citations

Abstract

Plants tolerate large variations in the intensity of the light environment by controlling the efficiency of solar to chemical energy conversion. To do this, plants have a mechanism to detect the intensity, duration, and change in light as they experience moving shadows, flickering light, and cloud cover. Sugars are the primary products of CO2 fixation, a metabolic pathway that is rate limited by this solar energy conversion. We propose that sugar is a signal encoding information about the intensity, duration and change in the light environment. We previously showed that the Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G protein complex including its receptor-like Regulator of G signaling protein, AtRGS1, detects both the concentration and the exposure time of sugars (Fu et al., 2014. Cell 156: 1084–1095). This unique property, designated dose-duration reciprocity, is a behavior that emerges from the system architecture / system motif. Here, we show that another property of the signaling system is to detect large changes in light while at the same time, filtering types of fluctuation in light that do not affect photosynthesis efficiency. When AtRGS1 is genetically ablated, photosynthesis efficiency is reduced in a changing- but not a constant-light environment. Mathematical modeling revealed that information about changes in the light environment is encoded in the amount of free AtRGS1 that becomes compartmentalized following stimulation. We propose that this property determines when to adjust photosynthetic efficiency in an environment where light intensity changes abruptly caused by moving shadows on top of a background of light changing gradually from sun rise to sun set and fluctuating light such as that caused by fluttering leaves.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages231-244
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Theoretical Biology
Volume414
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 7 2017

Fingerprint

Photosynthesis
Detector
detectors
photosynthesis
Detectors
Light
Sugars
Sun
sugars
duration
energy conversion
light intensity
Arabidopsis
G Protein
Solar Energy
Reciprocity
Light Intensity
Fixation
System Architecture
Regulator

Keywords

  • Endocytosis
  • Heterotrimeric G protein
  • Photosynthesis efficiency
  • Regulator of G signaling
  • Shadow detector
  • WNK kinase

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Statistics and Probability
  • Modeling and Simulation
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Applied Mathematics

Cite this

Liao, K. L., Jones, R. D., McCarter, P., Tunc-Ozdemir, M., Draper, J. A., Elston, T. C., ... Jones, A. M. (2017). A shadow detector for photosynthesis efficiency. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 414, 231-244. DOI: 10.1016/j.jtbi.2016.11.027

A shadow detector for photosynthesis efficiency. / Liao, Kang Ling; Jones, Roger D.; McCarter, Patrick; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Draper, James A.; Elston, Timothy C.; Kramer, David; Jones, Alan M.

In: Journal of Theoretical Biology, Vol. 414, 07.02.2017, p. 231-244.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Liao, KL, Jones, RD, McCarter, P, Tunc-Ozdemir, M, Draper, JA, Elston, TC, Kramer, D & Jones, AM 2017, 'A shadow detector for photosynthesis efficiency' Journal of Theoretical Biology, vol 414, pp. 231-244. DOI: 10.1016/j.jtbi.2016.11.027
Liao KL, Jones RD, McCarter P, Tunc-Ozdemir M, Draper JA, Elston TC et al. A shadow detector for photosynthesis efficiency. Journal of Theoretical Biology. 2017 Feb 7;414:231-244. Available from, DOI: 10.1016/j.jtbi.2016.11.027
Liao, Kang Ling ; Jones, Roger D. ; McCarter, Patrick ; Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral ; Draper, James A. ; Elston, Timothy C. ; Kramer, David ; Jones, Alan M./ A shadow detector for photosynthesis efficiency. In: Journal of Theoretical Biology. 2017 ; Vol. 414. pp. 231-244
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