A Pilot Study of a Mindfulness Intervention for Adolescents and the Potential Role of Self-Compassion in Reducing Stress

Karen Bluth, Patricia N.E. Roberson, Susan A. Gaylord

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective In this pilot study, we sought to investigate the effects of a mindfulness intervention for adolescents on a community sample of teens. Specifically, we explored the effects of mindfulness training on emotional well-being outcomes. Also, we examined the relationship between mindfulness and self-compassion at baseline-predicted outcome measures. Design This design was a pre-/post-pilot intervention study. Paired t-tests were conducted to examine change in outcome measures before and after the mindfulness intervention. Multiple regression was also conducted to investigate the influence of baseline mindfulness and self-compassion on outcome measures. Setting The study took place after school in a classroom at a local university. Participants Overall 28 adolescents age 10-18 years from two different cohorts participated in this study. Intervention Learning to BREATHE, a mindfulness curriculum designed specifically for adolescents and taught in six 1.5 h sessions, was implemented. Main Outcome Measures The outcome measures, life satisfaction and perceived stress, were included in an online survey before and after the mindfulness intervention. Results Results indicated that mindfulness, self-compassion, perceived stress, and life satisfaction improved from pre-intervention to post-intervention. Further, self-compassion (taught within the mindfulness intervention) was negatively related to perceived stress post-intervention while controlling for baseline stress. These findings suggest that mindfulness may be an effective intervention for improving indicators of emotional well-being among an adolescent population. Additionally, self-compassion may be a pathway through which youth can lower stress. Future research should examine self-compassion as a potential factor in promoting emotional well-being.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages292-295
Number of pages4
JournalExplore: The Journal of Science and Healing
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

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Mindfulness
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Baseline
t-test
Multiple Regression
Child Welfare
Psychological Stress
Curriculum
Pathway
Learning

Keywords

  • adolescence
  • Mindfulness
  • Self-Compassion
  • stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Analysis
  • Nursing(all)
  • Chiropractics
  • Complementary and alternative medicine

Cite this

A Pilot Study of a Mindfulness Intervention for Adolescents and the Potential Role of Self-Compassion in Reducing Stress. / Bluth, Karen; Roberson, Patricia N.E.; Gaylord, Susan A.

In: Explore: The Journal of Science and Healing, Vol. 11, No. 4, 01.07.2015, p. 292-295.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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