A Path Model of Expressive Vocabulary Skills in Initially Preverbal Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Jena McDaniel, Paul Yoder, Linda R. Watson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 1 Citations

Abstract

We examined direct and indirect paths involving receptive vocabulary and diversity of key consonants used in communication (DKCC) to improve understanding of why previously identified value-added predictors are associated with later expressive vocabulary for initially preverbal children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD; n = 87). Intentional communication, DKCC, and parent linguistic responses accounted for unique variance in later expressive vocabulary when controlling for mid-point receptive vocabulary, but responding to joint attention did not. We did not confirm any indirect paths through mid-point receptive vocabulary. DKCC mediated the association between intentional communication and expressive vocabulary. Further research is needed to replicate the findings, test potentially causal relations, and provide a specific sequence of intervention targets for preverbal children with ASD.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages947-960
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

Vocabulary
Preschool Children
Communication
Linguistics
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Research

Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Language
  • Path modeling
  • Predictors
  • Preverbal
  • Vocabulary

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

A Path Model of Expressive Vocabulary Skills in Initially Preverbal Preschool Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. / McDaniel, Jena; Yoder, Paul; Watson, Linda R.

In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Vol. 47, No. 4, 01.04.2017, p. 947-960.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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